5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Hikikomori, a Japanese Culture-Bound Syndrome of Social Withdrawal? : A Proposal for DSM-5

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A form of severe social withdrawal, called hikikomori, has been frequently described in Japan and is characterized by adolescents and young adults who become recluses in their parents' homes, unable to work or go to school for months or years. The aim of this study was to review the evidence for hikikomori as a new psychiatric disorder. Electronic and manual literature searches were used to gather information on social withdrawal and hikikomori, including studies examining case definitions, epidemiology, and diagnosis. A number of recent empirical studies have emerged from Japan. The majority of such cases of hikikomori are classifiable as a variety of existing Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) psychiatric disorders. However, a notable subset of cases with substantial psychopathology does not meet criteria for any existing psychiatric disorder. We suggest hikikomori may be considered a culture-bound syndrome and merits further international research into whether it meets accepted criteria as a new psychiatric disorder. Research diagnostic criteria for the condition are proposed.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 14

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Issues for DSM-V: internet addiction.

           Torin Block (2008)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The Japanese hikikomori phenomenon: acute social withdrawal among young people

             Andy Furlong (2008)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A new form of social withdrawal in Japan: a review of hikikomori.

               Alan Teo (2010)
              The purpose of this article is to provide a clinical review of a unique, emerging form of severe social withdrawal that has been described in Japan. This paper begins with a case vignette, then reviews the case definition, epidemiology, psychopathology, differential diagnosis, and treatment and management of the condition. Called hikikomori, it is well known to both the psychiatric community and general public in Japan but it has never been reviewed in the English medical literature. Patients are mostly adolescent and young adult men who become recluses in their parents' homes for months or years. They withdraw from contact with family, rarely have friends, and do not attend school or hold a job. Never described before the late 1970s, hikikomori has become a silent epidemic with tens, perhaps hundreds, of thousands of cases now estimated in Japan. The differential diagnosis includes anxiety and personality disorders, but current nosology in the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders may not adequately capture the concept of hikikomori. Treatment strategies are varied and lack a solid evidence base, but often include milieu, family, and exposure therapy. Much further research, including population-based and prospective studies, needs to be conducted to characterize and provide an evidence base for treatment of this condition.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
                The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0022-3018
                2010
                June 2010
                : 198
                : 6
                : 444-449
                Article
                10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181e086b1
                20531124
                © 2010

                Comments

                Comment on this article