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      Size matters: gold nanoparticles in targeted cancer drug delivery

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      Therapeutic Delivery
      Future Science Ltd

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          Abstract

          Cancer is the current leading cause of death worldwide, responsible for approximately one quarter of all deaths in the USA and UK. Nanotechnologies provide tremendous opportunities for multimodal, site-specific drug delivery to these disease sites and Au nanoparticles further offer a particularly unique set of physical, chemical and photonic properties with which to do so. This review will highlight some recent advances, by our laboratory and others, in the use of Au nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery to these malignancies and will also provide insights into their rational design, synthesis, physiological properties and clinical/preclinical applications, as well as strategies and challenges toward the clinical implementation of these constructs moving forward.

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          Most cited references160

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          A study of the nucleation and growth processes in the synthesis of colloidal gold

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            Photodynamic therapy for cancer.

            The therapeutic properties of light have been known for thousands of years, but it was only in the last century that photodynamic therapy (PDT) was developed. At present, PDT is being tested in the clinic for use in oncology--to treat cancers of the head and neck, brain, lung, pancreas, intraperitoneal cavity, breast, prostate and skin. How does PDT work, and how can it be used to treat cancer and other diseases?
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              Nanocarriers as an emerging platform for cancer therapy.

              Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize cancer diagnosis and therapy. Advances in protein engineering and materials science have contributed to novel nanoscale targeting approaches that may bring new hope to cancer patients. Several therapeutic nanocarriers have been approved for clinical use. However, to date, there are only a few clinically approved nanocarriers that incorporate molecules to selectively bind and target cancer cells. This review examines some of the approved formulations and discusses the challenges in translating basic research to the clinic. We detail the arsenal of nanocarriers and molecules available for selective tumour targeting, and emphasize the challenges in cancer treatment.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Therapeutic Delivery
                Therapeutic Delivery
                Future Science Ltd
                2041-5990
                2041-6008
                April 2012
                April 2012
                : 3
                : 4
                : 457-478
                Article
                10.4155/tde.12.21
                3596176
                22834077
                fceedec0-32bd-4af5-8b35-6efc0ca88d4f
                © 2012
                History

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