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      Gastropericardial Fistula as a Late Complication of Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

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          Abstract

          Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a bariatric procedure that is being performed with increasing frequency as an alternative management option for morbid obesity. Several common complications have been reported including gastric band slippage and associated pouch dilatation, intragastric erosion of the band, gastric wall perforation, and abscess formation. We present a case of gastropericardial fistula occurring nine years after an LAGB. There have been no previous documented cases of the complication after this procedure.

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          Gastropericardial fistula: a case report and review of literature.

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            Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: what radiologists need to know.

            Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is performed with increasing frequency for the management of morbid obesity. Although LAGB is less invasive than other bariatric surgical procedures, it is associated with various complications that may lead to nonspecific abdominal symptoms several months or years after the procedure. Because complications of LAGB may be encountered incidentally at imaging for other indications, all radiologists should be familiar with the appearances of correctly positioned and malpositioned gastric bands, normal and abnormal appearances of the postprocedural pouch and stomach, and imaging features suggestive or indicative of early or delayed complications of LAGB. Familiarity with the techniques and systems currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in this procedure may help radiologists detect postoperative complications and guide their management. Both commercially available systems include a silicone gastric band with an inflatable inner surface, a reservoir port, and a tube that connects the port to the gastric band. All these components of LAGB systems should be visible at radiologic imaging; however, older models of gastric bands may not be radiopaque and therefore may not be depicted on images. The most common complications of LAGB are gastric band slippage and associated pouch dilatation, intragastric erosion of the band, gastric perforation, and abscess formation. Complications that occur with less frequency include tube migration, tube disconnection, port-site infection, and small bowel obstruction.
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              Gastropericardial fistula after laparoscopic surgery for reflux disease.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Clin Imaging Sci
                J Clin Imaging Sci
                JCIS
                Journal of Clinical Imaging Science
                Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd (India )
                2156-7514
                2156-5597
                2017
                27 January 2017
                : 7
                Affiliations
                Department of Radiology, Gastroenterology and General Surgery, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA, USA
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Dr. Adam A Rudd, Department of Radiological Sciences, 101 The City Drive South, Route 140, Orange, CA 92868, USA. E-mail: arudd@ 123456uci.edu
                Article
                JCIS-7-3
                10.4103/2156-7514.199053
                5288955
                Copyright: © 2017 Journal of Clinical Imaging Science

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

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                Case Report

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