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      A STUDY ON THE EVALUATION METHODS OF INDOOR LIGHT ENVIRONMENT FOR OCCUPANT COMFORT AND WELL-BEING

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          ABSTRACT

          Since the COVID-19 pandemic, awareness of the importance of the indoor environment has increased. The indoor light environment is crucial because it impacts the energy consumption of buildings and affects human health and biorhythms as people spend most of their time indoors. Previous studies have concluded that the indoor light environment is essential to human health. However, it is not sufficient to analyze and evaluate the indoor light environment related to occupants’ health in the context of building design. Therefore, this study aims to review and propose an indoor light environment evaluation methodology for human well-being using quantitative and qualitative evaluations of light, health, and environment. This study presents guidelines for evaluating buildings’ indoor light environment for sustainability and well-being. Additionally, it provides an overall checklist of the indoor light environment evaluation process in Conceptualization, Light Environment Identification, Questionnaire, Environment Analysis, Comparison, and Conclusion. The evaluation checklist established through the results of this study could help establish a research methodology for the indoor light environment for human well-being and apply it to evaluate indoor light environments for residents’ comfort and well-being.

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          The Pittsburgh sleep quality index: A new instrument for psychiatric practice and research

          Despite the prevalence of sleep complaints among psychiatric patients, few questionnaires have been specifically designed to measure sleep quality in clinical populations. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) is a self-rated questionnaire which assesses sleep quality and disturbances over a 1-month time interval. Nineteen individual items generate seven "component" scores: subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication, and daytime dysfunction. The sum of scores for these seven components yields one global score. Clinical and clinimetric properties of the PSQI were assessed over an 18-month period with "good" sleepers (healthy subjects, n = 52) and "poor" sleepers (depressed patients, n = 54; sleep-disorder patients, n = 62). Acceptable measures of internal homogeneity, consistency (test-retest reliability), and validity were obtained. A global PSQI score greater than 5 yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 89.6% and specificity of 86.5% (kappa = 0.75, p less than 0.001) in distinguishing good and poor sleepers. The clinimetric and clinical properties of the PSQI suggest its utility both in psychiatric clinical practice and research activities.
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            The journal coverage of Web of Science and Scopus: a comparative analysis

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              Short form 36 (SF36) health survey questionnaire: normative data for adults of working age.

              To gain population norms for the short form 36 health survey questionnaire (SF36) in a large community sample and to explore the questionnaire's internal consistency and validity. Postal survey by using a booklet containing the SF36 and several other items concerned with lifestyles and illness. The sample was drawn from computerised registers of the family health services authorities for Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, and Oxfordshire. 13,042 randomly selected subjects aged 18-64 years. Scores for the eight health dimensions of the SF36. The survey achieved a response rate of 72% (n = 9332). Internal consistency of the different dimensions of the questionnaire was high. Normative data broken down by age, sex, and social class were consistent with those from previous studies. The SF36 is a potentially valuable tool in medical research. The normative data provided here may further facilitate its validation and use.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1943-4618
                1552-6100
                Winter 2024
                23 February 2024
                : 19
                : 1
                : 205-234
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Architecture, Hongik University, Seoul 04066, Republic of Korea; kkl881008@ 123456gmail.com
                [2 ]Department of Future & Smart Construction Research, KICT, Goyang-Si 10223, Republic of Korea; juklee531@ 123456gmail.com
                Author notes
                [* ]Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: ksunlee01@ 123456gmail.com Tel.: +82-10-3731-2170 (K.L.)
                Article
                10.3992/jgb.19.1.205
                fd6bc656-0b01-4062-972d-45e81c396597
                © 2024 College Publishing
                History
                Page count
                Pages: 30
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

                Urban design & Planning,Civil engineering,Environmental management, Policy & Planning,Architecture,Environmental engineering
                Daylight,Building design,Sustainability,Well-being,Indoor light environment,Evaluation system

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