Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: not found
  • Article: not found

Adapting Management of Marine Environments to a Changing Climate: A Checklist to Guide Reform and Assess Progress

, , ,

Ecosystems

Springer Nature

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisher
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 77

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A safe operating space for humanity.

        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Sustainability. Planetary boundaries: guiding human development on a changing planet.

        The planetary boundaries framework defines a safe operating space for humanity based on the intrinsic biophysical processes that regulate the stability of the Earth system. Here, we revise and update the planetary boundary framework, with a focus on the underpinning biophysical science, based on targeted input from expert research communities and on more general scientific advances over the past 5 years. Several of the boundaries now have a two-tier approach, reflecting the importance of cross-scale interactions and the regional-level heterogeneity of the processes that underpin the boundaries. Two core boundaries—climate change and biosphere integrity—have been identified, each of which has the potential on its own to drive the Earth system into a new state should they be substantially and persistently transgressed.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Climate change impacts on marine ecosystems.

          In marine ecosystems, rising atmospheric CO2 and climate change are associated with concurrent shifts in temperature, circulation, stratification, nutrient input, oxygen content, and ocean acidification, with potentially wide-ranging biological effects. Population-level shifts are occurring because of physiological intolerance to new environments, altered dispersal patterns, and changes in species interactions. Together with local climate-driven invasion and extinction, these processes result in altered community structure and diversity, including possible emergence of novel ecosystems. Impacts are particularly striking for the poles and the tropics, because of the sensitivity of polar ecosystems to sea-ice retreat and poleward species migrations as well as the sensitivity of coral-algal symbiosis to minor increases in temperature. Midlatitude upwelling systems, like the California Current, exhibit strong linkages between climate and species distributions, phenology, and demography. Aggregated effects may modify energy and material flows as well as biogeochemical cycles, eventually impacting the overall ecosystem functioning and services upon which people and societies depend.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            Ecosystems
            Ecosystems
            Springer Nature
            1432-9840
            1435-0629
            March 2016
            October 19 2015
            : 19
            : 2
            : 187-219
            10.1007/s10021-015-9925-2
            © 2015

            http://www.springer.com/tdm

            Comments

            Comment on this article