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      Adapting to obesity with adipose tissue inflammation

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      Nature Reviews Endocrinology

      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          Adipose tissue inflammation is an adaptive response to overnutrition in the early stages of obesity, but later becomes maladaptive. Here, Reilly and Saltiel review the cellular and molecular mechanisms of obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue and discuss potential therapeutic approaches.

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          Most cited references 98

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          Macrophage-specific PPARgamma controls alternative activation and improves insulin resistance.

          Obesity and insulin resistance, the cardinal features of metabolic syndrome, are closely associated with a state of low-grade inflammation. In adipose tissue chronic overnutrition leads to macrophage infiltration, resulting in local inflammation that potentiates insulin resistance. For instance, transgenic expression of Mcp1 (also known as chemokine ligand 2, Ccl2) in adipose tissue increases macrophage infiltration, inflammation and insulin resistance. Conversely, disruption of Mcp1 or its receptor Ccr2 impairs migration of macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby lowering adipose tissue inflammation and improving insulin sensitivity. These findings together suggest a correlation between macrophage content in adipose tissue and insulin resistance. However, resident macrophages in tissues display tremendous heterogeneity in their activities and functions, primarily reflecting their local metabolic and immune microenvironment. While Mcp1 directs recruitment of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages to sites of tissue damage, resident macrophages, such as those present in the adipose tissue of lean mice, display the alternatively activated phenotype. Despite their higher capacity to repair tissue, the precise role of alternatively activated macrophages in obesity-induced insulin resistance remains unknown. Using mice with macrophage-specific deletion of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), we show here that PPARgamma is required for maturation of alternatively activated macrophages. Disruption of PPARgamma in myeloid cells impairs alternative macrophage activation, and predisposes these animals to development of diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, gene expression profiling revealed that downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation gene expression in skeletal muscle and liver leads to decreased insulin sensitivity in these tissues. Together, our findings suggest that resident alternatively activated macrophages have a beneficial role in regulating nutrient homeostasis and suggest that macrophage polarization towards the alternative state might be a useful strategy for treating type 2 diabetes.
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            Cloning of adiponectin receptors that mediate antidiabetic metabolic effects.

            Adiponectin (also known as 30-kDa adipocyte complement-related protein; Acrp30) is a hormone secreted by adipocytes that acts as an antidiabetic and anti-atherogenic adipokine. Levels of adiponectin in the blood are decreased under conditions of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Administration of adiponectin causes glucose-lowering effects and ameliorates insulin resistance in mice. Conversely, adiponectin-deficient mice exhibit insulin resistance and diabetes. This insulin-sensitizing effect of adiponectin seems to be mediated by an increase in fatty-acid oxidation through activation of AMP kinase and PPAR-alpha. Here we report the cloning of complementary DNAs encoding adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) by expression cloning. AdipoR1 is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle, whereas AdipoR2 is predominantly expressed in the liver. These two adiponectin receptors are predicted to contain seven transmembrane domains, but to be structurally and functionally distinct from G-protein-coupled receptors. Expression of AdipoR1/R2 or suppression of AdipoR1/R2 expression by small-interfering RNA supports our conclusion that they serve as receptors for globular and full-length adiponectin, and that they mediate increased AMP kinase and PPAR-alpha ligand activities, as well as fatty-acid oxidation and glucose uptake by adiponectin.
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              IKK-beta links inflammation to obesity-induced insulin resistance.

              Inflammation may underlie the metabolic disorders of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. IkappaB kinase beta (IKK-beta, encoded by Ikbkb) is a central coordinator of inflammatory responses through activation of NF-kappaB. To understand the role of IKK-beta in insulin resistance, we used mice lacking this enzyme in hepatocytes (Ikbkb(Deltahep)) or myeloid cells (Ikbkb(Deltamye)). Ikbkb(Deltahep) mice retain liver insulin responsiveness, but develop insulin resistance in muscle and fat in response to high fat diet, obesity or aging. In contrast, Ikbkb(Deltamye) mice retain global insulin sensitivity and are protected from insulin resistance. Thus, IKK-beta acts locally in liver and systemically in myeloid cells, where NF-kappaB activation induces inflammatory mediators that cause insulin resistance. These findings demonstrate the importance of liver cell IKK-beta in hepatic insulin resistance and the central role of myeloid cells in development of systemic insulin resistance. We suggest that inhibition of IKK-beta, especially in myeloid cells, may be used to treat insulin resistance.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Endocrinology
                Nat Rev Endocrinol
                Springer Nature
                1759-5029
                1759-5037
                August 11 2017
                August 11 2017
                :
                :
                Article
                10.1038/nrendo.2017.90
                © 2017

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