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      Gut microbiota and human NAFLD: disentangling microbial signatures from metabolic disorders

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          Most cited references 78

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          Improvement of Insulin Sensitivity after Lean Donor Feces in Metabolic Syndrome Is Driven by Baseline Intestinal Microbiota Composition

          The intestinal microbiota has been implicated in insulin resistance, although evidence regarding causality in humans is scarce. We therefore studied the effect of lean donor (allogenic) versus own (autologous) fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to male recipients with the metabolic syndrome. Whereas we did not observe metabolic changes at 18 weeks after FMT, insulin sensitivity at 6 weeks after allogenic FMT was significantly improved, accompanied by altered microbiota composition. We also observed changes in plasma metabolites such as γ-aminobutyric acid and show that metabolic response upon allogenic FMT (defined as improved insulin sensitivity 6 weeks after FMT) is dependent on decreased fecal microbial diversity at baseline. In conclusion, the beneficial effects of lean donor FMT on glucose metabolism are associated with changes in intestinal microbiota and plasma metabolites and can be predicted based on baseline fecal microbiota composition.
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            Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a precursor of the metabolic syndrome.

            The conventional paradigm of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease representing the "hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome" is outdated. We identified and summarized longitudinal studies that, supporting the association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with either type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome, suggest that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease precedes the development of both conditions. Online Medical databases were searched, relevant articles were identified, their references were further assessed and tabulated data were checked. Although several cross-sectional studies linked nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to either diabetes and other components of the metabolic syndrome, we focused on 28 longitudinal studies which provided evidence for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as a risk factor for the future development of diabetes. Moreover, additional 19 longitudinal reported that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease precedes and is a risk factor for the future development of the metabolic syndrome. Finally, molecular and genetic studies are discussed supporting the view that aetiology of steatosis and lipid intra-hepatocytic compartmentation are a major determinant of whether fatty liver is/is not associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Data support the novel paradigm of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as a strong determinant for the development of the metabolic syndrome, which has potentially relevant clinical implications for diagnosing, preventing and treating metabolic syndrome.
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              The role of the gut microbiota in NAFLD.

              NAFLD is now the most common cause of liver disease in Western countries. This Review explores the links between NAFLD, the metabolic syndrome, dysbiosis, poor diet and gut health. Animal studies in which the gut microbiota are manipulated, and observational studies in patients with NAFLD, have provided considerable evidence that dysbiosis contributes to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Dysbiosis increases gut permeability to bacterial products and increases hepatic exposure to injurious substances that increase hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Dysbiosis, combined with poor diet, also changes luminal metabolism of food substrates, such as increased production of certain short-chain fatty acids and alcohol, and depletion of choline. Changes to the microbiome can also cause dysmotility, gut inflammation and other immunological changes in the gut that might contribute to liver injury. Evidence also suggests that certain food components and lifestyle factors, which are known to influence the severity of NAFLD, do so at least in part by changing the gut microbiota. Improved methods of analysis of the gut microbiome, and greater understanding of interactions between dysbiosis, diet, environmental factors and their effects on the gut-liver axis should improve the treatment of this common liver disease and its associated disorders.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology
                Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1759-5045
                1759-5053
                March 9 2020
                Article
                10.1038/s41575-020-0269-9
                fe2c69e2-34b0-4a23-958d-eef2145214e5
                © 2020

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