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      Ecology and Evolution
      John Wiley and Sons Inc.

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          Abstract

          In the recent article by Aagaard et al. (2022), the out‐of‐date USGS statement has been removed in the Acknowledgments of the article and it now reads as follows:

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          Effects of weather variation on waterfowl migration: Lessons from a continental‐scale generalizable avian movement and energetics model

          Abstract We developed a continental energetics‐based model of daily mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) movement during the non‐breeding period (September to May) to predict year‐specific migration and overwinter occurrence. The model approximates movements and stopovers as functions of metabolism and weather, in terms of temperature and frozen precipitation (i.e., snow). The model is a Markov process operating at the population level and is parameterized through a review of literature. We applied the model to 62 years of daily weather data for the non‐breeding period. The average proportion of available habitat decreased as weather severity increased, with mortality decreasing as the proportion of available habitat increased. The most commonly used locations during the course of the non‐breeding period were generally consistent across years, with the most inter‐annual variation present in the overwintering area. Our model revealed that the distribution of mallards on the landscape changed more dramatically when the variation in daily available habitat was greater. The main routes for avian migration in North America were predicted by our simulations: the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific flyways. Our model predicted an average of 77.4% survivorship for the non‐breeding period across all years (range = 76.4%–78.4%), with lowest survivorship during autumn (90.5 ± 1.4%), intermediate survivorship in winter (91.8 ± 0.7%), and greatest survivorship in spring (93.6 ± 1.1%). We provide the parameters necessary for exploration within and among other taxa to leverage the generalizability of this migration model to a broader expanse of bird species, and across a range of climate change and land use/land cover change scenarios.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Ecol Evol
            Ecol Evol
            10.1002/(ISSN)2045-7758
            ECE3
            Ecology and Evolution
            John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
            2045-7758
            20 July 2022
            July 2022
            20 July 2022
            : 12
            : 7 ( doiID: 10.1002/ece3.v12.7 )
            Article
            ECE39148
            10.1002/ece3.9148
            9300841
            fe2fca43-0745-438a-8dbb-528adecb2202
            © 2022 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

            This is an open access article under the terms of the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Page count
            Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Pages: 1, Words: 108
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            Corrigendum
            Corrigendum
            Custom metadata
            2.0
            July 2022
            Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_JATSPMC version:6.1.7 mode:remove_FC converted:20.07.2022

            Evolutionary Biology
            Evolutionary Biology

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