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      Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survivorship: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

      , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , On behalf of the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Genomic and Precision Medicine; Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research; and Stroke Council

      Circulation

      Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)

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          Abstract

          Cardiac arrest systems of care are successfully coordinating community, emergency medical services, and hospital efforts to improve the process of care for patients who have had a cardiac arrest. As a result, the number of people surviving sudden cardiac arrest is increasing. However, physical, cognitive, and emotional effects of surviving cardiac arrest may linger for months or years. Systematic recommendations stop short of addressing partnerships needed to care for patients and caregivers after medical stabilization. This document expands the cardiac arrest resuscitation system of care to include patients, caregivers, and rehabilitative healthcare partnerships, which are central to cardiac arrest survivorship.

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          Most cited references 185

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          Seventh INTERMACS annual report: 15,000 patients and counting.

          The seventh annual report of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) summarizes the first 9 years of patient enrollment. The Registry includes >15,000 patients from 158 participating hospitals. Trends in device strategy, patient profile at implant and survival are presented. Risk factors for mortality with continuous-flow pumps are updated, and the major causes/modes of death are presented. The adverse event burden is compared between eras, and health-related quality of life is reviewed. A detailed analysis of outcomes after mechanical circulatory support for ambulatory heart failure is presented. Recent summary data from PediMACS and MedaMACS is included. With the current continuous-flow devices, survival at 1 and 2 years is 80% and 70%, respectively.
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            Physical complications in acute lung injury survivors: a two-year longitudinal prospective study.

            Survivors of severe critical illness frequently develop substantial and persistent physical complications, including muscle weakness, impaired physical function, and decreased health-related quality of life. Our objective was to determine the longitudinal epidemiology of muscle weakness, physical function, and health-related quality of life and their associations with critical illness and ICU exposures.
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              Implementation of a standardised treatment protocol for post resuscitation care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

              Mortality among patients admitted to hospital after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is high. Based on recent scientific evidence with a main goal of improving survival, we introduced and implemented a standardised post resuscitation protocol focusing on vital organ function including therapeutic hypothermia, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), control of haemodynamics, blood glucose, ventilation and seizures. All patients with OHCA of cardiac aetiology admitted to the ICU from September 2003 to May 2005 (intervention period) were included in a prospective, observational study and compared to controls from February 1996 to February 1998. In the control period 15/58 (26%) survived to hospital discharge with a favourable neurological outcome versus 34 of 61 (56%) in the intervention period (OR 3.61, CI 1.66-7.84, p=0.001). All survivors with a favourable neurological outcome in both groups were still alive 1 year after discharge. Two patients from the control period were revascularised with thrombolytics versus 30 (49%) receiving PCI treatment in the intervention period (47 patients (77%) underwent cardiac angiography). Therapeutic hypothermia was not used in the control period, but 40 of 52 (77%) comatose patients received this treatment in the intervention period. Discharge rate from hospital, neurological outcome and 1-year survival improved after standardisation of post resuscitation care. Based on a multivariate logistic analysis, hospital treatment in the intervention period was the most important independent predictor of survival.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Circulation
                Circulation
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0009-7322
                1524-4539
                February 12 2020
                February 12 2020
                Article
                10.1161/CIR.0000000000000747
                © 2020

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