0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Amniotic Membrane Corrects Surgically Induced Astigmatism

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Human amniotic membrane (AM) has been widely used for the reconstruction of ocular surface. We conducted this study to investigate whether AM shows efficacy in maintaining the correction of astigmatism or not. We performed photoastigmatic refractive keratectomy (PARK) on rabbits and grafted AM on the cornea. The effect of AM on the degree of astigmatism was evaluated by topography and cycloplegic refraction. As will be shown, AM did not show any efficacy in maintaining the correction of astigmatism. On the contrary, AM not only eliminated PARK-induced astigmatism but prevented surgically induced astigmatism. We suggest that AM could be a useful tool for controlling the astigmatism induced by laser refractive surgery. Further clinical study is still left to be elucidated.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 4

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Transplantation of preserved human amniotic membrane for surface reconstruction in severely damaged rabbit corneas.

           T. J. Kim,  J. Tseng (1995)
          After n-heptanol removal of the total corneal epithelium and a limbal lamellar keratectomy, 23 rabbit eyes developed features of limbal stem cell deficiency including conjunctival epithelial ingrowth, vascularization and chronic inflammation. One month later, 10 control eyes received a total keratectomy, and 13 experimental eyes received additional transplantation of glycerin-preserved human amniotic membrane. In 3 months of follow-up, all control corneas were revascularized to the center with granuloma and retained a conjunctival epithelial phenotype. In contrast, five corneas in the experimental group became clear with either minimal or no vascularization; the rest had either mid peripheral (n = 5) or total (n = 3) vascularization and cloudier stroma. The success of corneal surface reconstruction correlated with the return of a cornea-like epithelial phenotype and the preservation of amniotic membrane, whereas the failure maintained a conjunctival epithelial phenotype and the amniotic membrane was either partially degraded or covered by host fibrovascular stroma. These results suggest that measures taken to facilitate epithelialization without allowing host fibrovascular ingrowth onto the amniotic membrane might prove this procedure clinically useful for ocular surface reconstruction.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Reduction in corneal haze and apoptosis by amniotic membrane matrix in excimer laser photoablation in rabbits

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Surgically induced astigmatism after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                OPH
                Ophthalmologica
                10.1159/issn.0030-3755
                Ophthalmologica
                S. Karger AG
                0030-3755
                1423-0267
                2006
                November 2006
                10 November 2006
                : 220
                : 6
                : 389-392
                Affiliations
                Departments of aOphthalmology and bAnatomy and Cell Biology (BK21 program), Dong-A University, College of Medicine and Institute of Medical Science, Pusan, and cDepartment of Ophthalmology, Chung Ang University, College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
                Article
                95866 Ophthalmologica 2006;220:389–392
                10.1159/000095866
                17095885
                © 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 5, References: 17, Pages: 4
                Categories
                Original Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article