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      Changing Representation: The Vote of Non-­citizen Immigrant Residents in Their New Homeland

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          Changing Representation: The Vote of Non-citizen Immigrant Residents in Their New Homeland

          Living in a globalized world, where millions of people no longer live in their countries of birth, we ought to be asking ourselves whether and to what extent the traditional model of representative democracy is changing or needs to change. In particular, to what extent do citizens who live abroad participate in the democratic processes of their home country, and, conversely, what is the relationship with the electoral options in their new homelands? This research note explores the latter aspect by focusing on the Dutch national election held in March 2021. Based on a small sample of survey data, this exploratory analysis shows that non-citizen residents largely support less-established parties that have positioned themselves as parties that want to innovate and bring about new politics. This finding suggests that allowing immigrants to vote at national elections could have a visible impact on election outcomes.

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          Most cited references18

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          Transnational Politics and the State: The External Voting Rights of Diasporas

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            Why Are Immigrants Underrepresented in Politics? Evidence from Sweden

            Widespread and persistent political underrepresentation of immigrant-origin minorities poses deep challenges to democratic practice and norms. What accounts for this underrepresentation? Two types of competing explanations are prevalent in the literature: accounts that base minority underrepresentation on individual-level resources and accounts that emphasize political opportunity structures. However, due to the lack of data suitable for testing these explanations, existing research has not been able to adjudicate between these theories. Using registry-based microdata covering the entire Swedish adult population between 1991 and 2010 our study is the first to empirically evaluate these alternative explanations. We examine election outcomes to municipal councils over the course of six elections and find that variation in individual-level resources cannot explain immigrants’ underrepresentation. Further, when comparing immigrants and natives who face comparable political opportunity structures a large representation gap remains. Instead, we argue that discrimination by party gatekeepers plays a more significant role in perpetuating the underrepresentation of immigrants than do individual resources or structural variables.
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              Migration Background and Voting Behavior in Switzerland: A Socio-Psychological Explanation

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Ekaterina Rashkova is an Assistant Professor of Comparative Politics at the Utrecht University School of Governance. Her work focuses on party systems development, electoral politics, and representation.
                Journal
                PLC
                Politics of the Low Countries
                Eleven International Publishing (The Hague )
                2589-9929
                October 2022
                : 4
                : 2 , Demand- and Supply-side Approaches to Migrant Political Integration: A Focus on The Low Countries
                : 213-225 (pp. 213-225)
                Article
                PLC-D-22-00005
                10.5553/PLC/.000034
                fed2a86f-cfda-45bb-a83d-f8469566b834
                History
                Categories
                Practice
                Praktijk
                Research Note
                Research Note

                Political science
                the Netherlands,immigrant voting,party abroad,non-citizen resident
                Political science
                the Netherlands, immigrant voting, party abroad, non-citizen resident

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