Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      SWEET11 and 15 as key players in seed filling in rice.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Despite the relevance of seed-filling mechanisms for crop yield, we still have only a rudimentary understanding of the transport processes that supply the caryopsis with sugars. We hypothesized that SWEET sucrose transporters may play important roles in nutrient import pathways in the rice caryopsis. We used a combination of mRNA quantification, histochemical analyses, translational promoter-reporter fusions and analysis of knockout mutants created by genomic editing to evaluate the contribution of SWEET transporters to seed filling. In rice caryopses, SWEET11 and 15 had the highest mRNA levels and proteins localized to four key sites: all regions of the nucellus at early stages; the nucellar projection close to the dorsal vein; the nucellar epidermis that surrounds the endosperm; and the aleurone. ossweet11;15 double knockout lines accumulated starch in the pericarp, whereas caryopses did not contain a functional endosperm. Jointly, SWEET11 and 15 show all the hallmarks of being necessary for seed filling with sucrose efflux functions at the nucellar projection and a role in transfer across the nucellar epidermis/aleurone interface, delineating two major steps for apoplasmic seed filling, observations that are discussed in relation to observations made in rice and barley regarding the relative prevalence of these two potential import routes.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          New Phytol.
          The New phytologist
          Wiley
          1469-8137
          0028-646X
          Apr 2018
          : 218
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Institute for Molecular Physiology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf, 40225, Duesseldorf, Germany.
          [2 ] Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829, Cologne, Germany.
          [3 ] Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
          [4 ] Department of Genetics, Development, and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 50011, USA.
          [5 ] Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8602, Japan.
          Article
          10.1111/nph.15004
          29393510

          Comments

          Comment on this article