Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Coronary Artery Disease–Associated LIPA Coding Variant rs1051338 Reduces Lysosomal Acid Lipase Levels and Activity in Lysosomes

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text.

          Abstract

          Objective—

          Genome-wide association studies have linked variants at chromosome 10q23 with increased coronary artery disease risk. The disease-associated variants fall in LIPA, which encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), the enzyme responsible for lysosomal cholesteryl ester hydrolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA result in accelerated atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, the coronary artery disease variants are associated with increased LIPA expression in some cell types. In this study, we address this apparent contradiction.

          Approach and Results—

          We investigated a coding variant rs1051338, which is in high linkage disequilibrium ( r 2=0.89) with the genome-wide association study lead–associated variant rs2246833 and causes a nonsynonymous threonine to proline change within the signal peptide of LAL. Transfection of allele-specific expression constructs showed that the risk allele results in reduced lysosomal LAL protein ( P=0.004) and activity ( P=0.005). Investigation of LAL localization and turnover showed the risk LAL protein is degraded more quickly. This mechanism was confirmed in disease-relevant macrophages from individuals homozygous for either the nonrisk or risk allele. There was no difference in LAL protein or activity in whole macrophage extracts; however, we found reduced LAL protein ( P=0.02) and activity ( P=0.026) with the risk genotype in lysosomal extracts, suggesting that the risk genotype affects lysosomal LAL activity. Inhibition of the proteasome resulted in equal amounts of lysosomal LAL protein in risk and nonrisk macrophages.

          Conclusions—

          Our findings show that the coronary artery disease–associated coding variant rs1051338 causes reduced lysosomal LAL protein and activity because of increased LAL degradation, providing a plausible causal mechanism of increased coronary artery disease risk.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 51

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          SignalP 4.0: discriminating signal peptides from transmembrane regions.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

            Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries between 1990, and 2013. We used the results to assess whether there is epidemiological convergence across countries. We estimated age-sex-specific all-cause mortality using the GBD 2010 methods with some refinements to improve accuracy applied to an updated database of vital registration, survey, and census data. We generally estimated cause of death as in the GBD 2010. Key improvements included the addition of more recent vital registration data for 72 countries, an updated verbal autopsy literature review, two new and detailed data systems for China, and more detail for Mexico, UK, Turkey, and Russia. We improved statistical models for garbage code redistribution. We used six different modelling strategies across the 240 causes; cause of death ensemble modelling (CODEm) was the dominant strategy for causes with sufficient information. Trends for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias were informed by meta-regression of prevalence studies. For pathogen-specific causes of diarrhoea and lower respiratory infections we used a counterfactual approach. We computed two measures of convergence (inequality) across countries: the average relative difference across all pairs of countries (Gini coefficient) and the average absolute difference across countries. To summarise broad findings, we used multiple decrement life-tables to decompose probabilities of death from birth to exact age 15 years, from exact age 15 years to exact age 50 years, and from exact age 50 years to exact age 75 years, and life expectancy at birth into major causes. For all quantities reported, we computed 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). We constrained cause-specific fractions within each age-sex-country-year group to sum to all-cause mortality based on draws from the uncertainty distributions. Global life expectancy for both sexes increased from 65.3 years (UI 65.0-65.6) in 1990, to 71.5 years (UI 71.0-71.9) in 2013, while the number of deaths increased from 47.5 million (UI 46.8-48.2) to 54.9 million (UI 53.6-56.3) over the same interval. Global progress masked variation by age and sex: for children, average absolute differences between countries decreased but relative differences increased. For women aged 25-39 years and older than 75 years and for men aged 20-49 years and 65 years and older, both absolute and relative differences increased. Decomposition of global and regional life expectancy showed the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa. For most communicable causes of death both numbers of deaths and age-standardised death rates fell whereas for most non-communicable causes, demographic shifts have increased numbers of deaths but decreased age-standardised death rates. Global deaths from injury increased by 10.7%, from 4.3 million deaths in 1990 to 4.8 million in 2013; but age-standardised rates declined over the same period by 21%. For some causes of more than 100,000 deaths per year in 2013, age-standardised death rates increased between 1990 and 2013, including HIV/AIDS, pancreatic cancer, atrial fibrillation and flutter, drug use disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus for lower respiratory infections. Country-specific probabilities of death over three phases of life were substantially varied between and within regions. For most countries, the general pattern of reductions in age-sex specific mortality has been associated with a progressive shift towards a larger share of the remaining deaths caused by non-communicable disease and injuries. Assessing epidemiological convergence across countries depends on whether an absolute or relative measure of inequality is used. Nevertheless, age-standardised death rates for seven substantial causes are increasing, suggesting the potential for reversals in some countries. Important gaps exist in the empirical data for cause of death estimates for some countries; for example, no national data for India are available for the past decade. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Human genomics. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) pilot analysis: multitissue gene regulation in humans.

                (2015)
              Understanding the functional consequences of genetic variation, and how it affects complex human disease and quantitative traits, remains a critical challenge for biomedicine. We present an analysis of RNA sequencing data from 1641 samples across 43 tissues from 175 individuals, generated as part of the pilot phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We describe the landscape of gene expression across tissues, catalog thousands of tissue-specific and shared regulatory expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) variants, describe complex network relationships, and identify signals from genome-wide association studies explained by eQTLs. These findings provide a systematic understanding of the cellular and biological consequences of human genetic variation and of the heterogeneity of such effects among a diverse set of human tissues. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol
                Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol
                ATV
                Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
                Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
                1079-5642
                1524-4636
                June 2017
                24 May 2017
                : 37
                : 6
                : 1050-1057
                Affiliations
                From the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester and National Institute for Health Research Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, United Kingdom.
                Author notes
                Correspondence to Tom R. Webb, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, LE3 9QP, United Kingdom. E-mail tw126@ 123456le.ac.uk
                00011
                10.1161/ATVBAHA.116.308734
                5444428
                28279971
                © 2017 The Authors.

                Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology is published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work is properly cited.

                Product
                Categories
                10082
                10189
                Basic Sciences
                Custom metadata
                AL
                TRUE

                Comments

                Comment on this article