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      Riparian plant invasions: hydrogeomorphological control and ecological impacts

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          Abstract

          Biological invasions are a threat to ecosystems across all biogeographical realms. Riparian habitats are considered to be particularly prone to invasion by alien plant species and, because riparian vegetation plays a key role in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, research in this field has increased. Most studies have focused on the biology and autecology of invasive species and biogeographical aspects of their spread. However, given that hydrogeomorphological processes greatly influence the structure of riparian plant communities, and that these communities in turn affect hydrology and fluvial geomorphology, scant attention has been paid to the interactions between invasions and these physical processes. Similarly, relatively little research has been undertaken on competitive interactions between alien and native riparian plant species. Further research in these fields is necessary at a variety of spatial and temporal scales before the dynamics of riparian invasions, and their impacts, can be properly understood.

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          Most cited references 104

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          The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants

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            An Ecosystem Perspective of Riparian Zones

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              Does global change increase the success of biological invaders?

              Biological invasions are gaining attention as a major threat to biodiversity and an important element of global change. Recent research indicates that other components of global change, such as increases in nitrogen deposition and atmospheric CO2 concentration, favor groups of species that share certain physiological or life history traits. New evidence suggests that many invasive species share traits that will allow them to capitalize on the various elements of global change. Increases in the prevalence of some of these biological invaders would alter basic ecosystem properties in ways that feed back to affect many components of global change.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Progress in Physical Geography: Earth and Environment
                Progress in Physical Geography: Earth and Environment
                SAGE Publications
                0309-1333
                1477-0296
                March 2001
                August 18 2016
                March 2001
                : 25
                : 1
                : 22-52
                Affiliations
                [1 ]WWF-UK, Panda House, Weyside Park, Godalming, Surrey GU7 1XR, UK
                [2 ]School of Geography and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
                [3 ]Ecological Processes and Management, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Monks Wood, Abbots Ripton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE17 2LS, UK
                Article
                10.1177/030913330102500102
                © 2001

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