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      Why rejection hurts: a common neural alarm system for physical and social pain.

      1 ,
      Trends in cognitive sciences
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Numerous languages characterize 'social pain', the feelings resulting from social estrangement, with words typically reserved for describing physical pain ('broken heart', 'broken bones') and perhaps for good reason. It has been suggested that, in mammalian species, the social-attachment system borrowed the computations of the pain system to prevent the potentially harmful consequences of social separation. Mounting evidence from the animal lesion and human neuroimaging literatures suggests that physical and social pain overlap in their underlying neural circuitry and computational processes. We review evidence suggesting that the anterior cingulate cortex plays a key role in the physical-social pain overlap. We also suggest that the physical-social pain circuitry might share components of a broader neural alarm system.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Trends Cogn Sci
          Trends in cognitive sciences
          Elsevier BV
          1364-6613
          1364-6613
          Jul 2004
          : 8
          : 7
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Psychology, Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA. neisenbe@ucla.edu <neisenbe@ucla.edu>
          Article
          S1364661304001433
          10.1016/j.tics.2004.05.010
          15242688
          ff9b5210-c0fc-4b0a-9f90-8fdb18e6b44c
          History

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