Blog
About

6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Ikaros family zinc-finger 1 mutation is an independent factor for the poor prognosis of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can improve clinical outcomes

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Deletion of IKZF1 and prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

          Despite best current therapy, up to 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a relapse. Recent genomewide analyses have identified a high frequency of DNA copy-number abnormalities in ALL, but the prognostic implications of these abnormalities have not been defined. We studied a cohort of 221 children with high-risk B-cell-progenitor ALL with the use of single-nucleotide-polymorphism microarrays, transcriptional profiling, and resequencing of samples obtained at diagnosis. Children with known very-high-risk ALL subtypes (i.e., BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, hypodiploid ALL, and ALL in infants) were excluded from this cohort. A copy-number abnormality was identified as a predictor of poor outcome, and it was then tested in an independent validation cohort of 258 patients with B-cell-progenitor ALL. More than 50 recurring copy-number abnormalities were identified, most commonly involving genes that encode regulators of B-cell development (in 66.8% of patients in the original cohort); PAX5 was involved in 31.7% and IKZF1 in 28.6% of patients. Using copy-number abnormalities, we identified a predictor of poor outcome that was validated in the independent validation cohort. This predictor was strongly associated with alteration of IKZF1, a gene that encodes the lymphoid transcription factor IKAROS. The gene-expression signature of the group of patients with a poor outcome revealed increased expression of hematopoietic stem-cell genes and reduced expression of B-cell-lineage genes, and it was similar to the signature of BCR-ABL1-positive ALL, another high-risk subtype of ALL with a high frequency of IKZF1 deletion. Genetic alteration of IKZF1 is associated with a very poor outcome in B-cell-progenitor ALL. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            BCR-ABL1 lymphoblastic leukaemia is characterized by the deletion of Ikaros.

            The Philadelphia chromosome, a chromosomal abnormality that encodes BCR-ABL1, is the defining lesion of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). To define oncogenic lesions that cooperate with BCR-ABL1 to induce ALL, we performed a genome-wide analysis of diagnostic leukaemia samples from 304 individuals with ALL, including 43 BCR-ABL1 B-progenitor ALLs and 23 CML cases. IKZF1 (encoding the transcription factor Ikaros) was deleted in 83.7% of BCR-ABL1 ALL, but not in chronic-phase CML. Deletion of IKZF1 was also identified as an acquired lesion at the time of transformation of CML to ALL (lymphoid blast crisis). The IKZF1 deletions resulted in haploinsufficiency, expression of a dominant-negative Ikaros isoform, or the complete loss of Ikaros expression. Sequencing of IKZF1 deletion breakpoints suggested that aberrant RAG-mediated recombination is responsible for the deletions. These findings suggest that genetic lesions resulting in the loss of Ikaros function are an important event in the development of BCR-ABL1 ALL.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              IKZF1 deletions predict relapse in uniformly treated pediatric precursor B-ALL.

              Relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is often difficult to predict. To explore the prognostic impact of recurrent DNA copy number abnormalities on relapse, we performed high-resolution genomic profiling of 34 paired diagnosis and relapse ALL samples. Recurrent lesions detected at diagnosis, including PAX5, CDKN2A and EBF1, were frequently absent at relapse, indicating that they represent secondary events that may be absent in the relapse-prone therapy-resistant progenitor cell. In contrast, deletions and nonsense mutations in IKZF1 (IKAROS) were highly enriched and consistently preserved at the time of relapse. A targeted copy number screen in an unselected cohort of 131 precursor B-ALL cases, enrolled in the dexamethasone-based Dutch Childhood Oncology Group treatment protocol ALL9, revealed that IKZF1 deletions are significantly associated with poor relapse-free and overall survival rates. Separate analysis of ALL9-treatment subgroups revealed that non-high-risk (NHR) patients with IKZF1 deletions exhibited a approximately 12-fold higher relative relapse rate than those without IKZF1 deletions. Consequently, IKZF1 deletion status allowed the prospective identification of 53% of the relapse-prone NHR-classified patients within this subgroup and, therefore, serves as one of the strongest predictors of relapse at the time of diagnosis with high potential for future risk stratification.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Bone Marrow Transplantation
                Bone Marrow Transplant
                Springer Nature
                0268-3369
                1476-5365
                June 25 2018
                Article
                10.1038/s41409-018-0249-7
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article