22
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
4 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Building performance evaluation: Balancing energy and indoor environmental quality in a UK school building

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          There is a policy-driven focus, at present, on improving the energy performance of buildings. However, energy-related issues alone do not capture the full impact of buildings on occupants and the wider environment. The performance of a building also includes occupant wellbeing and indoor environmental quality. Specifically, in schools, indoor environmental quality (thermal comfort, indoor air quality, lighting and acoustics) is an important aspect. Additionally, the issue of the ‘performance gap’, generally focused on energy, also affects indoor environmental quality parameters and needs to be addressed holistically. This paper reports on a holistic building performance evaluation covering aspects of energy, thermal comfort, indoor air quality, lighting and acoustics. It assesses the performance issues and inter-relationships between energy and indoor environmental quality in a recently built school campus in London. Based on the evidence collated from this case study and supplementary literature, the endemic issues and constraints within the construction industry are explored, such as inappropriate design calculations and resistance to new low-carbon technologies. Further, lessons for improved performance in the design, operation and maintenance of schools are highlighted such as factoring in the changing building use trends during design and the significance of optimal operations and maintenance of building systems for better energy and indoor environmental quality performance. This study shows that if the building design focus primarily remains on energy, unintended consequence of indoor environmental quality underperformance may occur where there are conflicts between energy and indoor environmental quality objectives. An integrated approach to building performance can help address this issue.

          Practical application: There are often conflicts between energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) objectives in building design and operation. Most building performance evaluations are primarily focused on one set of these performance criteria. This building performance evaluation was done with an integrated energy and IEQ perspective. The study identifies the causes of underperformance in energy and IEQ in a recently built school in London. Some of the findings from this study provide lessons that are relevant across the industry for the delivery of low-carbon and healthy buildings. These lessons include methods to further strengthen the policy frameworks and design protocols along with overall improvements in the processes followed during design, construction and operation of schools and other non-domestic buildings. The paper can also inform building designers, contractors and facility managers about the ways to reduce the performance gap and achieve energy targets without unintended consequences for indoor environment.

          Related collections

          Most cited references27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Impact of indoor environmental quality on occupant well-being and comfort: A review of the literature

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Hazard assessment of chemical air contaminants measured in residences.

            Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper-bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for five activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes, and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM(2.5). Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM(2.5), formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO(2). This analysis identifies key chemical contaminants of concern in residential indoor air using a comprehensive and consistent hazard-evaluation protocol. The identification of a succinct group of chemical hazards in indoor air will allow for successful risk ranking and mitigation prioritization for the indoor residential environment. This work also indicates some common household activities that may lead to the acute levels of pollutant exposure and identifies hazardous chemicals for priority removal from consumer products and home furnishings. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Providing better thermal and air quality conditions in school classrooms would be cost-effective

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
                Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
                SAGE Publications
                0143-6244
                1477-0849
                May 2020
                December 31 2019
                May 2020
                : 41
                : 3
                : 343-360
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute for Environmental Design and Engineering, University College London, UCL, London, UK
                [2 ]Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, London, UK
                Article
                10.1177/0143624419897397
                ffe91b03-24df-4a0c-b5d0-fe9454519f17
                © 2020

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article