0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Lactobacillus hordei sp. nov., a bacteriocinogenic strain isolated from malted barley.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A high-throughput screening effort, designed to isolate bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from malted cereals, resulted in the isolation of four bacteriocin-producing strains that could not be assigned conclusively to recognized species. The four isolates (UCC128T, UCC125, UCC126 and UCC127) were found to share identical (100%) 16S rRNA gene sequences and were therefore deemed to belong to the same species. The strains were Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-motile homofermentative LAB. The closest recognized relative to strain UCC128T identified based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was Lactobacillus mali DSM 20444T (97% similarity). The strains were characterized phenotypically to identify specific growth requirements. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain UCC128T and L. mali DSM 20444T revealed a level of relatedness of only 39.4%. This indicates that strain UCC128T does not belong to the species L. mali. The four bacteriocin-producing strains are therefore considered to represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus hordei sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is UCC128T (=DSM 19519T=LMG 24241T).

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Int J Syst Evol Microbiol
          International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology
          Microbiology Society
          1466-5026
          1466-5026
          Sep 2008
          : 58
          : Pt 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Microbiology, National University of Ireland, Western Road, Cork, Ireland.
          Article
          58/9/2013
          10.1099/ijs.0.65584-0
          18768596
          ffef6b02-4773-4ff3-9afa-73a412576dcc
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article