Blog
About

120
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Childhood in a digital age: creative challenges for educational futures

      London Review of Education

      IOE Press

      CHANGING CHILDHOODS, 4 PS, EDUCATIONAL FUTURES, CREATIVITY IN EDUCATION

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The early twenty-first century is characterised by rapid change. Commentators note how permeating digital technologies engage increasing numbers of children, young people and adults as consumers and also producers. In the shifting technological landscape, childhood and youth are changing. Connectivity around the clock, with a parallel existence in virtual space, is seamlessly integrated with actual lives. Young people are skilful collaborators, navigating digital gaming and social networking with ease, capably generating and manipulating content, experimenting virtually with versions of their 'social face'. They are implicit, inherent and immersed consumers. They are digital possibility thinkers posing 'what if?' questions and engaging in 'as if' activity. This paper seeks to theorise such possibility thinking in a digital, marketised age, using two competing discourses: young people as vulnerable and at risk; or alternatively as capable and potent. The former perspective imbues anxiety about the digital revolution; the latter embraces it as exciting and enabling. As education providers seek to re-imagine themselves, neither is sufficient. Local and global challenges urgently demand our creative potential and wisdom. Drawing from work with schools, the paper argues for co-creating with students their education futures through dialogue to nurture the 4 Ps: plurality, playfulness, participation and possibilities.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          From Content to Context: Videogames as Designed Experience

           K Squire (2006)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Work Role Characteristics, Family Structure Demands, and Work/Family Conflict

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Digital childhood: electronic media and technology use among infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.

              The objectives of this study were to describe media access and use among US children aged 0 to 6, to assess how many young children fall within the American Academy of Pediatrics media-use guidelines, to identify demographic and family factors predicting American Academy of Pediatrics media-use guideline adherence, and to assess the relation of guideline adherence to reading and playing outdoors. Data from a representative sample of parents of children aged 0 to 6 (N = 1051) in 2005 were used. Descriptive analyses, logistic regression, and multivariate analyses of covariance were used as appropriate. On a typical day, 75% of children watched television and 32% watched videos/DVDs, for approximately 1 hour and 20 minutes, on average. New media are also making inroads with young children: 27% of 5- to 6-year-olds used a computer (for 50 minutes on average) on a typical day. Many young children (one fifth of 0- to 2-year-olds and more than one third of 3- to 6-year-olds) also have a television in their bedroom. The most common reason given was that it frees up other televisions in the house so that other family members can watch their own shows (54%). The majority of children aged 3 to 6 fell within the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, but 70% of 0- to 2-year-olds did not. This study is the first to provide comprehensive information regarding the extent of media use among young children in the United States. These children are growing up in a media-saturated environment with almost universal access to television, and a striking number have a television in their bedroom. Media and technology are here to stay and are virtually guaranteed to play an ever-increasing role in daily life, even among the very young. Additional research on their developmental impact is crucial to public health.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10430
                London Review of Education
                IOE Press
                1474-8460
                01 July 2012
                : 10
                : 2
                : 173-190
                Article
                1474-8460(20120701)10:2L.173;1- s5.phd /ioep/clre/2012/00000010/00000002/art00005
                10.1080/14748460.2012.691282
                Product
                Categories
                Articles

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                London Review of Education
                Volume 10, Issue 2

                Similar content 22

                Cited by 7