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      Being an academic: authorship, authenticity and authority

      research-article

      London Review of Education

      IOE Press

      ACADEMIC IDENTITY, AUTHENTICITY, AUDIT CULTURE, PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

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          Abstract

          The author's experience of three common academic activities – the production of a portfolio, the preparation of a CV and the submission of a research assessment report – are related respectively to authorship, authenticity and authority. A comparison is made of how the 'being of' an academic is expressed in these three textual enactments of academic life. The author analyses how his experience illustrates 'the terrors of performativity' (Ball 2003) and he concludes that this illuminates how personal violation parallels our barbarous treatment of the environment and many of the peoples in it; as our education becomes more systematised, more managed, more 'effective' in economic terms, it offers less and less of a barrier to social barbarity.

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          Most cited references 11

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          Crumbling Ivory Towers: Academic Organizing and its Gender Effects

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            Stressing Academe: The Wear and Tear of the New Public Management

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              The Purposes of Higher Education and the Changing Face of Academia

              While there is no recognised sub-discipline of 'the philosophy of higher education', there has been a steady flow of writings having just such an orientation, a flow that has increased in recent years. That flow has mainly taken two courses. On the one hand, those of a conservative persuasion hold to an ideal of higher education largely separate from society and find themselves, thereby, trying to identify any possible intellectual spaces in which universities may enjoy a position of being their own end. On the other hand, those of a post-modern persuasion convince themselves that no large purposes of their own can seriously be entertained by universities and that, therefore, only instrumental ends are available or that universities have simply to content themselves with their own form rather than their substance. Such a limited set of responses to the contemporary situation of universities is unnecessary. The very complexity of that situation, intermeshed as it is with the wider society, opens up new spaces and new universal challenges. It is possible for there to be a philosophical enterprise in relation to the university that also embraces large concerns and large future-oriented possibilities.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                10430
                London Review of Education
                IOE Press
                1474-8460
                01 July 2008
                : 6
                : 2
                : 99-109
                Article
                1474-8460(20080701)6:2L.99;1- s1.phd /ioep/clre/2008/00000006/00000002/art00001
                10.1080/14748460802184998
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