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      Disempowering and dislocating: how learners from diverse cultures read the role of the English language in UK higher education

      London Review of Education

      IOE Press

      CULTURE, INTERCULTURAL HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERCULTURAL FLUENCY, LINGUISTIC HEGEMONY

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          Abstract

          This paper explores how the English language privileges and empowers certain epistemologies and ontologies in international higher education in the UK. The author discusses how the English language is used to construct assumptions and practices to legitimise particular ways of constructing knowledge. The main argument is that language provides a lead in silencing and marginalising alternative forms of coming to know within diverse cultures, thus creating feelings of disempowerment and dislocation for some learners. The paper highlights how learners from different cultures make sense of the role of language within the context of UK higher education, in terms of power, cultural politics and intellectual hegemony. It also suggests that ontological and epistemological stances are socially and culturally constructed, albeit reduced to linguistic constructions within UK university contexts.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          10430
          London Review of Education
          IOE Press
          1474-8460
          01 July 2008
          : 6
          : 2
          : 159-169
          Article
          1474-8460(20080701)6:2L.159;1- s6.phd /ioep/clre/2008/00000006/00000002/art00006
          10.1080/14748460802185169
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          London Review of Education
          Volume 6, Issue 2

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