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      The Russian State, Eurasianism, and Civilisations in the Contemporary Global Political Economy

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            Abstract

            This article demonstrates the emerging significance of concepts pertaining to culture and civilisation in imagining the global political economy (GPE). It focuses on how certain Russian thinkers and officials employ such concepts to critique American hegemony, to consolidate and defend Russia's statist political apparatus, and to obtain legitimacy for Russian state conduct both at home and abroad. Russian debates over Eurasianism, civilisational difference and geopolitical identity were common in the 1990s and have filtered into Putin era Russian state discourse about Eurasian political and economic integration initiatives. Historicist analysis of world orders, a method inspired by the work of Robert Cox, is employed here to understand how intersubjective ideas derived from previous epochs are mobilised and transformed by social and political actors for contemporary political projects. Organic intellectuals of the Russian state articulate and legitimise state-sanctioned difference in an era in which once widely presumed integrative globalisation and American hegemony are being questioned.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Contributors
            Journal
            10.13169
            jglobfaul
            Journal of Global Faultlines
            Pluto Journals
            23977825
            20542089
            April 2014
            : 2
            : 1
            : 44-69
            Affiliations
            Dr Ray Silvius is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Winnipeg, Canada. He can be contacted at { r.silvius@ 123456uwinnipeg.ca }
            Article
            jglobfaul.2.1.0044
            10.13169/jglobfaul.2.1.0044
            978c4ddb-c6cc-42f7-b545-4a0123b173cd
            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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            Social & Behavioral Sciences

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