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      Training AAC Users in User-Centred Design

      1 , 2 , 1 , 1

      Accessible Design in the Digital World Conference 2005 (AD)

      Accessible Design in the Digital World Conference

      23-25 August 2005

      User centred design, Assistive technology, Augmentative and alternative communication

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          User-centred design (UCD) with a focus on usability provides product developers with a design approach in which users are involved in every stage of the process: when gathering requirements; when evaluating alternative designs; and when evaluating interactive prototypes. The characteristics of people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) make it difficult to follow a truly UCD approach, which in part may contribute to the high rejection of AAC devices. Training workshops have been delivered to introduce users and AAC professionals to the UCD process. Initial feedback indicates that they feel more empowered to evaluate systems and to engage in the design of new systems after attending the workshop.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Predictors of assistive technology abandonment.

          Technology abandonment may have serious repercussions for individuals with disabilities and for society. The purpose of this study was to determine how technology users decide to accept or reject assistive devices. Two hundred twenty-seven adults with various disabilities responded to a survey on device selection, acquisition, performance, and use. Results showed that 29.3% of all devices were completely abandoned. Mobility aids were more frequently abandoned than other categories of devices, and abandonment rates were highest during the first year and after 5 years of use. Four factors were significantly related to abandonment--lack of consideration of user opinion in selection, easy device procurement, poor device performance, and change in user needs or priorities. These findings suggest that technology-related policies and services need to emphasize consumer involvement and long-term needs of consumers to reduce device abandonment and enhance consumer satisfaction.
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            Effectiveness of Assistive Technology and Environmental Interventions in Maintaining Independence and Reducing Home Care Costs for the Frail Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Trial

             W Mann (1999)
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              Outcomes of assistive technology use on quality of life.

               Erin Scherer (1996)
              The results from many research efforts on the use of assistive devices are reviewed and summarized. Further, conceptual and methodological issues related to the use and abandonment of assistive technologies are discussed. Overall, this review should be helpful to professionals making device recommendations, documenting the need for a device, and assessing short- and long-term device utilization. The available literature lends support to a model of matching person and technology that considers environments of device use, characteristics of the user's preferences and expectations, and device features and functions. To ensure that assistive technologies enhance users' quality of life, future emphases should focus on consumer involvement in the selection and evaluation of appropriate assistive technology, and ways to make technologies more widely available and affordable.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                August 2005
                August 2005
                : 1-7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Applied Computing, University of Dundee, Scotland
                [2 ]School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Sydney, Australia
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/AD2005.2
                © Annalu Waller et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Accessible Design in the Digital World Conference 2005, Dundee, Scotland

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Accessible Design in the Digital World Conference 2005
                AD
                Dundee, Scotland
                23-25 August 2005
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Accessible Design in the Digital World Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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