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      Considerations for the Design of Composite 3D Printed ‘Intermediate Level’ Trumpets

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      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017) (EVA)

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

      11 – 13 July 2017

      3D printing, 3D printed trumpet, Composite materials, Timbre, Acoustic impedance

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          Abstract

          Using 3D printing techniques, it is now possible to create almost any small to medium object including brasswind instruments. However, creating a competitive brasswind instrument requires a different approach to conventional 3D printing– demanding specialised printing techniques which, up to now, have only been applied to the prototyping stage. This paper is a review of the considerations in the design process for a composite B♭ trumpet aimed at the intermediate level player. The trumpet is the next step up from introductory level instruments such as the pTrumpet or Tromba. As such, it must be comparable to brass equivalents available from manufacturers such as Vincent Bach, Getzen, and Yamaha. The acceptance of such an instrument is as important as the design therefore composite instruments would need to have ‘added value’ compared to their brass counterparts if they are to be successful in the marketplace. Many professional trumpet players such as Alison Balsom, Mike Lovatt, Sam Ritchie and Charlie Peterson have already endorsed the plastic trumpet for student use. To introduce an intermediate or professional composite instrument may therefore be considered appropriate at this time. Two hybrid prototype B♭ intermediate level trumpets are fabricated using 3D printing techniques and analysed using different bell types. Consideration of timbre, ease of playing (ergonomics and fatigue), leadpipe and bell design is discussed. The application of different 3D printing technologies is also considered. The resultant trumpets are shown to be comparable to typical mid-range brass equivalents.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Influence of wall vibrations on the sound of brass wind instruments

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            The 3D Printed Flute: Digital Fabrication and Design of Musical Instruments

             Amit Zoran (2011)
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              Influence of wall vibrations on the behaviour of a simplified wind instrument

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2017
                July 2017
                : 282-289
                Affiliations
                Birmingham City University

                Faculty of Computing, Engineering and the Built Environment

                Millennium Point, Curzon Street

                Birmingham B4 7XG, UK
                Warwick Music Group

                Suite 4, Stablethorpe

                Thorpe Constantine

                Tamworth B79 0LH

                UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/EVA2017.58
                © Gibson et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2017, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017)
                EVA
                London, UK
                11 – 13 July 2017
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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