Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Constructing a Dance Pathography: Integrating the performing arts, multimedia and digital medical humanities

Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA)

Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

9 - 13 July 2018

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      The role of dance in society has become increasingly interdisciplinary and transformed through the use of technology. This expands its possibilities as a means of non-verbal communication. Similarly, the integration of the arts and humanities with medical science expands the range of possibilities offered to researchers of all disciplines to communicate about the experience of illness as well as contribute to treatment.

      One illness that is made more complex by its history and social stigma is adolescent bipolar disorder (ABPD). Similar yet distinct from adult-onset bipolar disorder, ABPD exacts a toll on the patients and the people around them. At the same time, early intervention is possible and potentially effective. Yet there are still few narratives created about ABPD that can educate the public about the need for empathy and early intervention - a gap that could potentially be filled by dance and other creative arts.

      This short paper describes the author’s process for creating a virtual reality (VR) dance pathography prototype. The process will form the basis for a participatory research workshop.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 6

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Phenomenology of children and adolescents with bipolar spectrum disorders.

      Children and adolescents who present with manic symptoms frequently do not meet the full DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder (BP-I). To assess the clinical presentation and family history of children and adolescents with BP-I, bipolar II disorder (BP-II), and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS). Subjects and their primary caretaker were assessed by semistructured interview, and family psychiatric history was obtained from interview of the primary caretaker. Outpatient and inpatient units at 3 university centers. A total of 438 children and adolescents (mean +/- SD age, 12.7 +/- 3.2 years) with BP-I (n = 255), BP-II (n = 30), or BP-NOS (n = 153). Lifetime psychiatric history and family history of psychiatric disorders. Youth with BP-NOS were not diagnosed as having BP-I primarily because they did not meet the DSM-IV duration criteria for a manic or mixed episode. There were no significant differences among the BP-I and BP-NOS groups in age of onset, duration of illness, lifetime rates of comorbid diagnoses, suicidal ideation and major depression, family history, and the types of manic symptoms that were present during the most serious lifetime episode. Compared with youth with BP-NOS, subjects with BP-I had more severe manic symptoms, greater overall functional impairment, and higher rates of hospitalization, psychosis, and suicide attempts. Elevated mood was present in 81.9% of subjects with BP-NOS and 91.8% of subjects with BP-I. Subjects with BP-II had higher rates of comorbid anxiety disorders compared with the other 2 groups and had less functional impairment and lower rates of psychiatric hospitalization than the subjects with BP-I. Children and adolescents with BP-II and BP-NOS have a phenotype that is on a continuum with that of youth with BP-I. Elevated mood is a common feature of youth with BP-spectrum illness.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Predicting bipolar disorder on the basis of phenomenology: implications for prevention and early intervention.

        Bipolar disorder is a multifaceted illness and there is often a substantial delay between the first onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Early detection has the potential to curtail illness progression and disorder-associated burden but it requires a clear understanding of the initial bipolar prodrome. This article summarizes the phenomenology of bipolar disorder with an emphasis on the initial prodrome, the evolution of the illness, and the implications for prevention and early intervention. A literature review was undertaken using Medline, Web of Science, and a hand search of relevant literature using keywords (e.g., phenomenology, initial or early symptoms, risk factors, and predictors/prediction). Findings from the literature were reviewed and synthesized and have been put into a clinical context. Bipolar disorder is a recurrent, persistent, and disabling illness that typically develops in adolescence or early adulthood. The literature search yielded 28 articles, in which mood lability, nonspecific, non-mood symptoms, and cyclothymic temperament were the most cited prodromal features. A small number of key prospective studies have provided evidence in support of an initial bipolar prodrome; however, methodological differences across studies have prohibited its clear delineation. It is, therefore, not currently possible to anticipate those who will develop bipolar disorder solely on the basis of early phenomenology. Accurate characterization of the bipolar disorder prodrome through high-quality, prospective research studies with adequate control groups will ultimately facilitate prompt and accurate diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar disorder-I phenotype: review of phenomenology and longitudinal course.

          Phenomenology, assessment, longitudinal, and psychosocial findings from an ongoing, controlled, prospective study of 93 subjects with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar disorder phenotype (PEA-BP) will be reviewed. Unlike adult-onset bipolar disorder, for which there were over 50 years of systematic investigations, there were a paucity of rigorous data and much controversy and skepticism about the existence and characteristics of prepubertal-onset mania. With this background, issues to address for investigation of child-onset mania included the following: (i) What to do about the differentiation of mania from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (ii) How to deal with the ubiquity of irritability as a presenting symptom in multiple child psychiatry disorders. (iii) Development of a research instrument to assess prepubertal manifestations of adult mania (i.e. children do not 'max out' credit cards or have four marriages). (iv) How to distinguish normal childhood happiness and expansiveness from pathologically impairing elated mood and grandiosity. To address these issues, a PEA-BP phenotype was defined as DSM-IV mania with elated mood and/or grandiosity as one inclusion criterion. This criterion ensured that the diagnosis of mania was not made using only criteria that overlapped with those for ADHD, and that subjects had at least one of the two cardinal symptoms of mania (i.e. elated mood and grandiose behaviors). Subjects were aged 10.9 years (SD = 2.6) and age of onset of the current episode at baseline was 7.3 years (SD = 3.5). Validation of PEA-BP was shown by reliable assessment, 6-month stability, and 1- and 2-year diagnostic longitudinal outcome. PEA-BP resembled the severest form of adult-onset mania by presenting with a chronic, mixed mania, psychotic, continuously (ultradian) cycling picture. Counterintuitively, typical 7-year-old children with PEA-BP were more severely ill than typical 27 year olds with adult-onset mania. Moreover, longitudinal data strongly supported differentiation of PEA-BP from ADHD.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            School of Creative Media

            City University of Hong Kong
            Contributors
            Conference
            July 2018
            July 2018
            : 113-114
            10.14236/ewic/EVA2018.20
            © Kim. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2018, UK

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
            EVA
            London, UK
            9 - 13 July 2018
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

            Comments

            Comment on this article