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      The Use of Human Brain Activity (Electroencephalogram) in the Making of Art

      Proceedings of EVA London 2019 (EVA 2019)

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

      8 - 11 July 2019

      Electroencephalogram, ADC sampling rates, Quantum of consciousness, Intrapersonal conduit

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Recording EEG from awake humans has been possible for nearly 100 years, with the majority of development being in medical science for the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. The potential use of the EEG as a way of reading or controlling another person’s mind has however become a staple of fiction writers for even longer. In recent years with the increasing power of computers and reduced cost of processing, small cheap, non-clinical EEG systems have appeared on the market. Whilst their use has been limited mainly to the computer gaming world, artists in many disciplines have incorporated the ‘output’ generated by these devices as part of their art project. Null Object: Gustav Metzger thinks about nothing: London Fieldworks and The mutual wave machine: Lia Chavez and Matthias Oostrik are two notable examples. A question remains though as to how much of the art is the EEG itself as opposed to that of the analysis, processing and presentation directed by the artist? In answering those questions I plan to demonstrate: Live recording of human brain activity (EEG) with emphasis on high quality broad waveform (wide filter) data acquisition and its manipulation by simple measure such as eye closure and hyperventilation and sleepiness; analysis of EEG data, both online and offline and how this can be used to control a number of peripheral devices such as 2D plotter, 3D printer, light projection and sound generation. In the discussion of the demonstration and the paper I wish to: show the potential of EEG recording and creativity; point out some of the common pitfalls in recording EEG data including, poor technique, artefacts and external noise, which can drown out any true EEG activity; discuss whether the best BCI currently available is the human hand; speak of the ability to over-manipulate the data so what is left is an alias of the original and has little or no bearing on real brain activity (a real danger with post hoc analysis or processing) and question the need for minimum standards of reporting methods when creating EEG art to allow critique and reproduction in keeping with general scientific protocol.

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          Most cited references 11

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          Brain-to-Brain Synchrony Tracks Real-World Dynamic Group Interactions in the Classroom.

          The human brain has evolved for group living [1]. Yet we know so little about how it supports dynamic group interactions that the study of real-world social exchanges has been dubbed the "dark matter of social neuroscience" [2]. Recently, various studies have begun to approach this question by comparing brain responses of multiple individuals during a variety of (semi-naturalistic) tasks [3-15]. These experiments reveal how stimulus properties [13], individual differences [14], and contextual factors [15] may underpin similarities and differences in neural activity across people. However, most studies to date suffer from various limitations: they often lack direct face-to-face interaction between participants, are typically limited to dyads, do not investigate social dynamics across time, and, crucially, they rarely study social behavior under naturalistic circumstances. Here we extend such experimentation drastically, beyond dyads and beyond laboratory walls, to identify neural markers of group engagement during dynamic real-world group interactions. We used portable electroencephalogram (EEG) to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of 12 high school students over the course of a semester (11 classes) during regular classroom activities (Figures 1A-1C; Supplemental Experimental Procedures, section S1). A novel analysis technique to assess group-based neural coherence demonstrates that the extent to which brain activity is synchronized across students predicts both student class engagement and social dynamics. This suggests that brain-to-brain synchrony is a possible neural marker for dynamic social interactions, likely driven by shared attention mechanisms. This study validates a promising new method to investigate the neuroscience of group interactions in ecologically natural settings.
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            EEG in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

            Electroecenphalography (EEG) is an integral part of the diagnostic process in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The EEG has therefore been included in the World Health Organisation diagnostic classification criteria of CJD. In sporadic CJD (sCJD), the EEG exhibits characteristic changes depending on the stage of the disease, ranging from nonspecific findings such as diffuse slowing and frontal rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA) in early stages to disease-typical periodic sharp wave complexes (PSWC) in middle and late stages to areactive coma traces or even alpha coma in preterminal EEG recordings. PSWC, either lateralized (in earlier stages) or generalized, occur in about two-thirds of patients with sCJD, with a positive predictive value of 95%. PSWC occur in patients with methionine homozygosity and methionine/valine heterozygosity but only rarely in patients with valine homozygosity at codon 129 of the prion protein gene. PSWC tend to disappear during sleep and may be attenuated by sedative medication and external stimulation. Seizures are an uncommon finding, occurring in less than 15% of patients with sCJD. In patients with iatrogenic CJD, PSWC usually present with more regional EEG findings corresponding to the site of inoculation of the transmissible agent. In genetic CJD, PSWC in its typical form are uncommon, occurring in about 10%. No PSWC occur in EEG recordings of patients with variant CJD.
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              Fax Art

               D. Hockney (1989)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2019
                July 2019
                : 353-359
                Affiliations
                Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth

                University of Chichester, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/EVA2019.67
                © Moore. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2019, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of EVA London 2019
                EVA 2019
                London, UK
                8 - 11 July 2019
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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