Blog
About

44
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Visualising Rave Music in Virtual Reality: Symbolic and interactive approaches

      Proceedings of EVA London 2020 (EVA 2020)

      AI and the Arts: Artificial Imagination

      6th July – 9th July 2020

      Music visualisation, Virtual reality, Rave music, Sound design, VJing, Visual music

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The virtual reality (VR) experience Cyberdream VR was presented at various events in 2019, including the Event Two exhibition of computer art held at the Royal College of Art. This short demo for Oculus Gear VR provided a c.5 minute sonic journey, in which the user moves through a series of symbolic environments based on the futuristic techno-utopian or dystopian imagery of 1990s rave flyers. These environments accompanied an original soundtrack of rave music and vaporwave, allowing users to enjoy the music whilst feeling as though they are inside synaesthetic virtual spaces related to the symbolic imagery of rave culture. This paper will discuss the subsequent development of this project, which is now being adapted for the Oculus Quest VR headset. Rajmil Fischman’s concept of ‘music in the holodeck’, suggests a possible new paradigm for performing with sound in VR, which is informative for the latest phase of Cyberdream's development. Drawing on ideas such as this, at a macro level of compositional structure, Cyberdream seeks ways to provide a continuous experience analogous to a DJ or VJ set, through blending of music tracks between scenes. Meanwhile, at a micro level of compositional structure, the user can trigger audio-visual ‘sound toys’ with the Oculus Quest Touch controllers. These are conceived as a means through which the user can intuitively ‘paint with sound’ in 3D space, improvising with the music, whilst also generating synaesthetic imagery. The design of the audio-visual 'sound toys' allows both the macro and micro elements to rhythmically interlock, so that sound can be generated in synchronisation with the music, while the corresponding visual imagery merges with the spatial environments. This paper will discuss on-going work on this project, advancing the discourse regarding the visualisation of hardcore rave music in virtual reality.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 15

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A Framework for Immersive Virtual Environments (FIVE): Speculations on the Role of Presence in Virtual Environments

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Virtual Reality Musical Instruments: State of the Art, Design Principles, and Future Directions

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Interactive Visual Music: A personal perspective

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2020
                July 2020
                : 78-84
                Affiliations
                London South Bank University

                London, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/EVA2020.13
                © Weinel. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2020

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of EVA London 2020
                EVA 2020
                30
                London
                6th July – 9th July 2020
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                AI and the Arts: Artificial Imagination
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning and Development Ltd
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

                Comments

                Comment on this article