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      Afrobits: An interactive installation of African music and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade

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      Proceedings of EVA London 2020 (EVA 2020)

      AI and the Arts: Artificial Imagination

      6th July – 9th July 2020

      Interaction design, Digital humanities, History, Cultural heritage, Museum studies

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          Summary

          This paper introduces Afrobits, an interactive installation about African music and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Its main aim is to bring to light invisible stories hidden behind geographic epistemologies. The installation highlights the contribution that African cultures had on the tangible and intangible cultural heritage of the world, such as popular music. Although it covers diverse countries, we focused on the Americas, placing emphasis on Latin-America as the biopolitical space that enabled the integration of native cultures with African peoples. As this project involved web scientists, graphic designers, historians, digital humanists and artists, we also discuss the benefits of interdisciplinary research; contributions from University researchers for the development of storytelling projects for the Cultural Heritage sector; and the implementation of complex technologies and research methods.

          Abstract

          This paper introduces Afrobits, an interactive installation about African music and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Its main aim is to bring to light invisible stories hidden behind geographic epistemologies. The installation highlights the contribution that African cultures had on the tangible and intangible cultural heritage of the world, such as popular music. Although it covers diverse countries, we focused on the Americas, placing emphasis on Latin-America as the biopolitical space that enabled the integration of native cultures with African peoples. As this project involved web scientists, graphic designers, historians, digital humanists and artists, we also discuss the benefits of interdisciplinary research; contributions from University researchers for the development of storytelling projects for the Cultural Heritage sector; and the implementation of complex technologies and research methods.

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          Most cited references 15

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            Yu wele

            (1992)
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              Ee wan wabina ikuk and Lukembe tuning

               H. ROWELL (1966)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2020
                July 2020
                : 106-111
                Affiliations
                Liverpool John Moores University

                Liverpool, UK
                Lancaster University

                Lancaster, UK
                University College London

                London, UK
                EatenAlive

                Warrington, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/EVA2020.19
                © Pereda et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2020

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of EVA London 2020
                EVA 2020
                30
                London
                6th July – 9th July 2020
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                AI and the Arts: Artificial Imagination
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning and Development Ltd
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

                The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

                Applied computer science, Computer science, Security & Cryptology, Graphics & Multimedia design, General computer science, Human-computer-interaction

                BLM, Black Lives Matter, Decolonization, Slave Trade, Slavery, History, Digital humanities, Museum studies, Interaction design, Cultural heritage

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