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      TEACHING FORMAL METHODS: Lessons To Learn

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      2nd Irish Workshop on Formal Methods (FM)

      Irish Workshop on Formal Methods

      2-3 July 1998

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          Abstract

          Formal methods should be taught as part of any degree in computing science or software engineering. We believe that discrete mathematics is the foundation upon which software development can be lifted up to the heights of a true engineering discipline. The transfer of formal methods to industry cannot be expected to occur without first transferring, from academia to industry, graduates who are well grounded in suchmathematical techniques. These graduatesmust bring a positive, yet realistic, view on the application of formal methods. Our goal is to produce software engineers who will go out into industry understanding the principles of specification, design and implementation. As these graduates develop their engineering skills, in an industrial setting, they should have the means, and the motivation, to integrate formality and rigour into any environment in which they are found. In this way, the formal methods should start to ‘sell themselves’.

          This paper reports on our first attempt to teach a formal methods course as part of a degree in software engineering. Rather than concentrating on one particular method, we worked on a set of small case studies, using the mathematics in a flexible and intuitive manner, where the students could appreciate the need for formality. Each case study was intended to illustrate, in turn, the need for some fundamental formalism. An unexpected result was that we also identified weaknesses in our understanding of formal methods: students’ naive questioning helped us to identify how the methods, and the teaching of these methods, could be improved. In brief, it was not just the students who were learning!

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          Most cited references 6

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          Extensional equivalences for transition systems

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            Seven more myths of formal methods

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              Using Miranda as a first programming language

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 1998
                July 1998
                : 1-13
                Affiliations
                Université Henri Poincaré (Nancy I), France

                Article
                10.14236/ewic/FM1998.4
                © Paul Gibson et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. 2nd Irish Workshop on Formal Methods, Cork, Ireland

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                2nd Irish Workshop on Formal Methods
                FM
                2
                Cork, Ireland
                2-3 July 1998
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Irish Workshop on Formal Methods
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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