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      Influencing Users Towards Better Passwords: Persuasive Cued Click-Points

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      People and Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction (HCI)

      Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction

      1 - 5 September 2008

      Graphical passwords, persuasive technology, usable security

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Usable security has unique usability challenges because the need for security often means that standard human-computerinteraction approaches cannot be directly applied. An important usability goal for authentication systems is to support users in selecting better passwords, thus increasing security by expanding the effective password space. In click-based graphical passwords, poorly chosen passwords lead to the emergence of hotspots – portions of the image where users are more likely to select click-points, allowing attackers to mount more successful dictionary attacks. We use persuasion to influence user choice in click-based graphical passwords, encouraging users to select more random, and hence more secure, click-points. Our approach is to introduce persuasion to the Cued Click-Points graphical password scheme (Chiasson, van Oorschot, Biddle, 2007). Our resulting scheme significantly reduces hotspots while still maintaining its usability.

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          Most cited references 8

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          A large-scale study of web password habits

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            A nonparametric measure of spatial interaction in point patterns

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              Pictorial superiority effect.

              Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. Paired-associate stimuli consisted of simple pictures or of their labels, with list items selected either from the same conceptual category or from different conceptual categories. In addition, schematic or visual similarity among the pictures was either high or low. At two rates of presentation equal amounts of conceptual interference were produced for pictures and their labels. High schematic similarity eliminated the pictorial superiority effects at the slow rate and completely reversed it at the fast rate. These results suggest that the meaning representations for simple pictures and their labels may be identical, and that the pictorial superiority effect is related to the qualitative superiority of the sensory codes for pictures.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2008
                September 2008
                : 121-130
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ]School of Computer Science

                Carleton University, Ottawa Canada
                [ 2 ]Human-Oriented Technology Lab

                Carleton University, Ottawa Canada
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2008.12
                © Sonia Chiasson et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. People and Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                People and Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction
                HCI
                22
                Conference Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
                1 - 5 September 2008
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Computers XXII Culture, Creativity, Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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