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      An Evaluation of a Meal Planning System: Ease of Use and Perceived Usefulness

      People and Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology (HCI)

      Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology

      1 - 5 September 2009

      Meal planning, ease of use, perceived usefulness

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          Abstract

          Unhealthy eating is an increasingly important problem in the western society. Our approach to this problem is to provide a meal planning system giving recommendations of suitable food recipes, taking important factors such as nutrient content, cost, variation, etc into account. A user controls how the system takes these factors into account through settings after which the system creates an optimal meal plan. The user can then iteratively refine the settings until a satisfactory meal plan is produced. The system is evaluated empirically in terms of ease of use and perceived usefulness, factors crucial for eventual user acceptance. The results are positive, and several interesting possibilities for future system improvements are discussed.

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          Most cited references 16

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          The free radical theory of aging matures.

           K Beckman,  James Ames (1998)
          The free radical theory of aging, conceived in 1956, has turned 40 and is rapidly attracting the interest of the mainstream of biological research. From its origins in radiation biology, through a decade or so of dormancy and two decades of steady phenomenological research, it has attracted an increasing number of scientists from an expanding circle of fields. During the past decade, several lines of evidence have convinced a number of scientists that oxidants play an important role in aging. (For the sake of simplicity, we use the term oxidant to refer to all "reactive oxygen species," including O2-., H2O2, and .OH, even though the former often acts as a reductant and produces oxidants indirectly.) The pace and scope of research in the last few years have been particularly impressive and diverse. The only disadvantage of the current intellectual ferment is the difficulty in digesting the literature. Therefore, we have systematically reviewed the status of the free radical theory, by categorizing the literature in terms of the various types of experiments that have been performed. These include phenomenological measurements of age-associated oxidative stress, interspecies comparisons, dietary restriction, the manipulation of metabolic activity and oxygen tension, treatment with dietary and pharmacological antioxidants, in vitro senescence, classical and population genetics, molecular genetics, transgenic organisms, the study of human diseases of aging, epidemiological studies, and the ongoing elucidation of the role of active oxygen in biology.
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            Good intentions, bad habits, and effects of forming implementation intentions on healthy eating

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              The theory of planned behavior and healthy eating.

              Application of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to healthy eating in 144 health promotion clinic attendees is reported. Respondents completed self-report TPB measures after the clinic (Time 1) and 6 months later (Time 2) with a measure of perceived past behavior. Intention stability was assessed on Time 1-2 differences. Six years later (Time 3), respondents completed measures of healthy eating intentions and behavior. Intentions were predicted by attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and perceived past behavior (cross-sectionally). Healthy eating behavior (Time 3) was predicted from intentions (Time 2). As intention stability increased, intentions and perceived past behavior became stronger and weaker predictors of behavior, respectively. Implications for understanding health cognitions in long-term performance of health behavior are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2009
                September 2009
                : 278-287
                Affiliations
                Dept. of Comp. and Info. Science, Linköpings universitet

                SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2009.33
                © Johan Aberg. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. People and Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology, Churchill College Cambridge, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                People and Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology
                HCI
                Churchill College Cambridge, UK
                1 - 5 September 2009
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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