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      Distal Tactile Feedback for Text Entry on Tabletop Computers

      ,

      People and Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology (HCI)

      Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology

      1 - 5 September 2009

      Tactile feedback, tabletop interaction, text entry, mobile phone

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          Abstract

          In this paper we present an initial study into the feasibility of using a mobile phone as a personal tactile display when interacting with a tabletop computer. There has been an increase in recent years in large touchscreen computers that use soft keyboards for text input. Text entry performance on such keyboards can be poor due to the lack of tactile feedback from the keys. Our approach is to use the vibration motor in a user’s mobile phone to provide personal haptic feedback for interactions with the touchscreen computer. We ran an experiment to compare text entry on a touchscreen device with the tactile feedback being presented at different distal locations on the body (locations at which a user might keep a mobile device. The conditions were: no tactile feedback, feedback directly on the device, feedback at the wrist, upper arm, chest, belt and trouser pocket). The results showed that distal tactile feedback significantly increased text entry rates when presented to the wrist and upper arm. This was not at the expense of a reduction in text entry accuracy. This shows that the concept of presenting tactile feedback on a user’s phone is an effective one and can improve interaction and text entry on tabletop computers.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Territoriality in collaborative tabletop workspaces

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            Vibrotactile transduction and transducers.

            The body's sense of touch is potentially a versatile channel for the conveyance of directional, spatial, command, and timing information. Most practical implementations of vibrotactile systems require compact, light-weight actuators that can be mounted against the body. Eccentric mass motors are widely used for this application, yet their output is limited and the effects of loading on the transducers due to the skin and mounting arrangement have been largely ignored. Conventional linear actuators are well suited as vibrotactile transducers and can provide high output, but are typically limited to laboratory research due to their large size and cost. The effect of loading on various practical vibrotactile transducers is investigated using a skin impedance phantom and measuring the transducer displacement with respect to additional mass loading. Depending on the transducer design, loading can dramatically reduce the vibratory displacement and, in the case of eccentric mass motors, also increase the operating frequency. In contrast, a new linear actuator design can be designed to be almost independent of skin loading, by considering the mechanical impedance of the load and optimizing the transducer contact area.
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              Investigating touchscreen typing: the effect of keyboard size on typing speed

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2009
                September 2009
                : 504-511
                Affiliations
                Glasgow Interactive Systems Group, Department of Computing Science

                University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK

                +44 141 330 4966

                www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~stephen
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2009.63
                © Christopher McAdam et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. People and Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology, Churchill College Cambridge, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                People and Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology
                HCI
                Churchill College Cambridge, UK
                1 - 5 September 2009
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Computers XXIII Celebrating People and Technology
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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