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      Human Computer Interaction and medical devices

      , ,

      Proceedings of HCI 2010 (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      6 - 10 September 2010

      Human Computer Interaction, hospital bed, patient safety, adverse events, medical device design, safety critical design, healthcare

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          Abstract

          To achieve dependable, usable, and well-engineered interactive devices in healthcare requires applied Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research and awareness of HCI issues throughout the lifecycle, from design through to procurement, training and use. This paper shows that some healthcare devices fall far short, and thus identifies a gap in applied HCI. We use a basic, interactive hospital bed as a case study, arguably so routine and simple enough that there should have been very few problems. However, the bed’s interactive control panel design violates standard HCI principles. It is also badly programmed by the manufacturer. Evidently, something has gone wrong, somewhere from design to procurement, and we argue most of the problems would have been managed or avoided by conventional HCI processes. Driven by the case study, this paper explores the problems and makes recommendations. There are many similarly poorly designed medical devices. Manufacturers and healthcare purchasing groups should adhere to HCI processes and guidelines, as well as those provided by regulatory agencies for the design, regulation, and procurement of devices, products, or systems that contribute to patient safety. The challenge is to make HCI knowledge and priorities available to and effective in this important domain in any places that can make a difference. Eye-tracking, awareness tools, machine learning, coordination, expertise

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          Most cited references 4

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          Using usability heuristics to evaluate patient safety of medical devices

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            Patient safety, potential adverse drug events, and medical device design: a human factors engineering approach.

            Adverse drug events are the single leading threat to patient safety. Human factors engineering has been repeatedly proposed, but largely untested, as the key to improving patient safety. The value of this approach was investigated in the context of a commercially available patient-controlled analgesia device that has been linked with several alleged patient injuries and deaths. Several reports have stated that errors in programming drug concentration were made during these adverse drug events. A simulation of the commercially available interface was compared experimentally with a simulated prototype of a new interface designed according to a human factors process. Professional nurses, averaging over 5 years of clinical experience with the commercially available interface and only minimal experience with the new interface, programmed both interfaces. The new interface eliminated drug concentration errors, whereas the simulated commercially available interface did not. Also, the new interface led to significantly fewer total errors and faster performance. These findings may have broad implications for the design, regulation, and procurement of biomedical devices, products, or systems that improve patient safety in clinical settings.
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              Hazards with medical devices: the role of design.

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2010
                September 2010
                : 168-176
                Affiliations
                FIT Lab, Future Interaction Technology Laboratory,

                Swansea University, Swansea, Wales
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2010.22
                © Chitra Acharya et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of HCI 2010, University of Abertay, Dundee, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of HCI 2010
                HCI
                24
                University of Abertay, Dundee, UK
                6 - 10 September 2010
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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