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      Self Affirming via the Web; A potential lifestyle behaviour intervention?

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      Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      4 - 8 July 2011

      Web-based Interventions, behaviour change, self affirmation theory, lifestyle behaviours

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          Abstract

          The potential for the internet to be utilised in the dissemination of health information is becoming increasingly apparent. This paper details the implementation of Self Affirmations into a web based programme, with the aim to assess the suitability of the web as a mode to deliver techniques that seek to motivate behaviour change. 58 undergraduate students participated in this pilot study. The results indicate that participants in the experimental condition (Self Affirmed) scored significantly higher on a measure to determine if they had Self Affirmed than the control group (p=0.01) and significantly higher on a measure of intent to change behaviour than the control group (p=0.002). This suggests that Self Affirmations can be successfully delivered online in order to impact on an individual’s intention to change their behaviour. The results highlight the positive manner in which the internet can be used to promote healthier lifestyle behaviours.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Does Literacy Mediate the Relationship between Education and Health Outcomes? A Study of a Low-Income Population with Diabetes

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            Self-affirmation promotes health behavior change.

            Evidence shows that self-affirmation has a positive effect on message acceptance and other variables that motivate health behavior change; however, this has not been translated into actual behavioral change. We propose that particular features of the previous studies may account for this failure; the current study addresses this. It is designed to test whether a self-affirmation manipulation can increase a health-promoting behavior (fruit and vegetable consumption). It also explores the extent to which efficacy variables mediate the self-affirmation and behavior relationship. Women (N = 93) were randomly allocated to a self-affirmation or control task prior to reading a message regarding the health-promoting effects of fruit and vegetables. MAIN OUTCOME-MEASURES: Response-efficacy, self-efficacy, and intention measures were taken immediately after exposure to the message, followed by a 7-day diary record of fruit and vegetable consumption. Self-affirmed participants ate significantly more portions of fruit and vegetables, an increase of approximately 5.5 portions across the week, in comparison to the control group. This effect was mediated by response-efficacy. Self-affirmation interventions can successfully influence health-promoting behaviors.
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              Developing and Testing a Self-affirmation Manipulation

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2011
                July 2011
                : 431-432
                Affiliations
                PaCT Lab

                Department of Psychology

                Northumbria University

                Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2011.12
                © Amy Fielden et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                25
                Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
                4 - 8 July 2011
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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