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Family vs. Individual Profiles in a Health Portal: Strengths and Weaknesses

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Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

Human Computer Interaction

4 - 8 July 2011

Family Support, Health Behaviour, User Profiles, Wellbeing, Evaluation

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      Abstract

      Our research aims at helping families work together to achieve a healthier lifestyle, increasing their awareness of what they currently do and what they could do differently. We built a prototype collaborative platform for families to see if we could facilitate health discussions and encourage supportive behaviour within the family. This paper presents a trial we conducted online where we investigated what would be more promising: an individual profile, space and goal, for each individual in a family, or a family profile, space and goal. We show that both conditions have their strengths and weaknesses: whereas a specific goal at the individual level tends to lead to better task performance, a shared goal seemed to promote support within the family. Similarly, whereas individual spaces seemed to encourage more personal reflections, the shared space attracted more non-task related visits to the portal by family members.

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      Family involvement in weight control, weight maintenance and weight-loss interventions: a systematic review of randomised trials.

      To conduct a descriptive systematic review into the nature and effectiveness of family involvement in weight control, weight maintenance and weight-loss interventions. We searched Medline and Psyclit for English language papers describing randomised trials with at least 1-y follow-up that evaluated interventions incorporating a family-based component. Studies involving people with eating disorders, learning disabilities and undernutrition or malnutrition were excluded. Data were extracted on characteristics of the participants, study design, target behaviours, nature of the intervention and study outcomes. A taxonomy was developed and used to classify family involvement in behaviour change interventions. Interventions were also classified according to an existing taxonomy that characterised the behaviour change techniques employed. A total of 21 papers describing 16 intervention studies were identified. Studies were small (mean sample size: 52), heterogeneous, poorly described but with few losses to follow-up (median 15%). The majority were North American and aimed at weight loss. Few studies described a theoretical underpinning to the behaviour change techniques employed. There was a suggestion that spouse involvement increased effectiveness but that adolescents achieved greater weight loss when treated alone. In studies including children, beneficial effects were seen when greater numbers of behaviour change techniques were taught to both parents and children. Relatively few intervention studies exist in this important area, particularly studies targeting adolescents, and they highlight continued uncertainty about how best to involve family members. The studies provide limited support for the involvement of spouses. They suggest that parental involvement is associated with weight loss in children, and that use of a greater range of behaviour change techniques improves weight outcomes for both parents and children. The development of future interventions and assessment of factors influencing effectiveness may be improved by paying careful attention to which family members are targeted and how they are involved in the intervention in terms of setting goals for behaviour change, providing support and training in behaviour change techniques.
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        Role of social support in lifestyle-focused weight management interventions.

        Social support is important to achieve beneficial changes in risk factors for disease, such as overweight and obesity. This paper presents the theoretical and practical framework for social support, and the mechanisms by which social support affects body weight. The theoretical and practical framework is supported with a literature review addressing studies involving a social support intervention for weight loss and weight loss maintenance. A major aspect in social support research and practice is the distinction between structural and functional support. Structural support refers to the availability of potential support-givers, while functional support refers to the perception of support. Interventions often affect structural support, for example, through peer groups, yet functional support shows a stronger correlation with health. Although positive correlations between social support and health have been shown, social support may also counteract health behaviour change. Most interventions discussed in this review showed positive health outcomes. Surprisingly, social support was clearly defined on a practical level in hardly any studies, and social support was assessed as an outcome variable in even fewer studies. Future social support intervention research would benefit from clear definitions of social support, a clear description of the intended mechanism of action and the actual intervention, and the inclusion of perceived social support as a study outcome.
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          Building a practically useful theory of goal setting and task motivation: A 35-year odyssey.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            CSIRO – ICT Centre

            PO Box76, Epping NSW 1710

            Australia
            Contributors
            Conference
            July 2011
            July 2011
            : 321-330
            10.14236/ewic/HCI2011.62
            © Nathalie Colineau et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
            HCI
            25
            Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
            4 - 8 July 2011
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            Human Computer Interaction
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

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