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      In a World of Their Own: Working on the Move

      ,

      Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      4 - 8 July 2011

      Awareness, Security, Observation

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The traditional model of white collar workers inhabiting offices to carry out their tasks is no longer valid in the 21st century. Many employees now carry information with them and work while travelling, in hotels and at home. This is a relatively recent development, however, and since the information they carry with them is often sensitive, we have to consider how this new model impacts on the security of the organisation’s now distributed and potentially unsecured information. Whereas previously employees could relax within the company’s office space, they now cannot let their guard down since they are surrounded by strangers who are not bound by the same loyalties or employment contracts. How aware are mobile workers of the risks of mobile working? Situational Awareness is a concept that has been well known since its role in the development in aircraft design following World War One. It continues to inform studies on the use of mobile phones in cars and the role of distraction in pedestrian accidents. This paper reports on research into leakage of sensitive business information that results from inattention to the risk of working in public places, while on the move.

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          The Hawthorne Experiments: First Statistical Interpretation

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              Mobile telephones, distracted attention, and pedestrian safety.

              Driver distraction is a major cause of traffic accidents, with mobile telephones as a key source of distraction. In two studies, we examined distraction of pedestrians associated with mobile phone use. The first had 60 participants walk along a prescribed route, with half of them conversing on a mobile phone, and the other half holding the phone awaiting a potential call, which never came. Comparison of the performance of the groups in recalling objects planted along the route revealed that pedestrians conversing recalled fewer objects than did those not conversing. The second study had three observers record pedestrian behavior of mobile phone users, i-pod users, and pedestrians with neither one at three crosswalks. Mobile phone users crossed unsafely into oncoming traffic significantly more than did either of the other groups. For pedestrians as with drivers, cognitive distraction from mobile phone use reduces situation awareness, increases unsafe behavior, putting pedestrians at greater risk for accidents, and crime victimization.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2011
                July 2011
                : 461-466
                Affiliations
                School of Computing Science

                University of Glasgow
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2011.77
                © Wendy Goucher et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                25
                Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
                4 - 8 July 2011
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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