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      Older people’s social sharing practices in YouTube through an ethnographical lens

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      The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      12 - 14 September 2012

      Social Network Sites, YouTube, Older people, Ethnography, User Experience

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          Abstract

          This paper reports on a classical, face-to-face ethnographical study of YouTube use and social sharing practices by 32 older people (65–90). The study was conducted in a computer clubhouse in Scotland over an 18-month period. Whereas research on Social Network Sites (SNS) is on the rise, very little is known about how people aged 60+ use them in their everyday lives, despite an ageing population. The study shows that the use of YouTube by this group of older people is occasional and motivated by face-to-face or online conversations in e-mails. They watch videos that they find meaningful, do not upload videos because they do not perceive any benefit in it, and search for videos by writing sentences, instead of clicking on categories, to reduce cognitive load. Online comments in YouTube are seldom read nor made. Instead, they make comments in f2f, and/or emails, always with key members of their social circles. They rate videos in these online and offline conversations, and share videos by capitalizing on previously learned strategies, such as copy-and- aste. We argue that these results provide a more complete picture of SNS and older people than that given by previous studies, and enable a discussion on their User Experience. We also discuss some implications for design.

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          Most cited references 8

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          Publicly Private and Privately Public: Social Networking on YouTube

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            Age differences in online social networking – A study of user profiles and the social capital divide among teenagers and older users in MySpace

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              User interactions in social networks and their implications

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2012
                September 2012
                : 185-194
                Affiliations
                Interactive Technologies Group

                Universitat Pompeu Fabra
                Dept of Computer Science

                University of Aberdeen
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2012.24
                © Sergio Sayago et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                26
                Birmingham, UK
                12 - 14 September 2012
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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