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      Snookered by an interruption? Use a cue

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      The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      12 - 14 September 2012

      Interruptions, Cueing, Disruption mitigation

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          Abstract

          When routine tasks are interrupted, erroneous slips become more likely. Expertise is no defence against these kinds of errors but visual hints can alleviate such negative effects in computer interfaces. We compared previous-action cueing with next-action cueing, measuring the effects on error rate, and found that both approaches were statistically equivalent in helping to mitigate the disruptive effects of interruptions. Following an interruption, a cue should be displayed highlighting the last action performed by the user – a trivial operation for software applications.

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          Most cited references 6

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          On the need for attention-aware systems: Measuring effects of interruption on task performance, error rate, and affective state

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            A memory for goals model of sequence errors

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              The effect of interruptions on postcompletion and other procedural errors: an account based on the activation-based goal memory model.

              A postcompletion error (PCE) is a specific kind of cognitive slip that involves omitting a final task step after the main goal of the task is accomplished. It is notoriously difficult to provoke (and hence study) slips under experimental conditions. In this paper, the authors present an experimental task paradigm that has been shown to be effective for studying PCEs in routine procedural tasks. Two studies were carried out to examine the effect of interruption position and task structure on the prevalence of PCEs. It was found that significantly more PCEs were obtained when an interruption occurred just before the PC step than when an interruption occurred at any other position in the task. The authors account for this effect in terms of Altmann and Trafton's activation-based goal memory model. The same interruption effect was obtained for some, but not all, other procedural errors; the authors discuss the nature of these errors and likely explanations for the differences. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2012
                September 2012
                : 251-256
                Affiliations
                UCL Interaction Centre

                8 th Floor MPEB, Malet Place

                UCL, London, WC1E 6BT
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2012.33
                © Stuart A Jones et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                26
                Birmingham, UK
                12 - 14 September 2012
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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