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      Towards measuring user engagement in internet interventions for common mental disorders

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      The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      12 - 14 September 2012

      user engagement, internet interventions, adherence, mental disorder, user experience

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          Abstract

          Internet interventions for common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety disorder, have become popular in research and are now gradually implemented in practice. However, many interventions suffer from low adherence of users which in turn leads to reduced effectiveness. In this context, research on adherence has frequently outlined the need for a better understanding of user engagement. To this end, our goal is to adapt, translate and validate a questionnaire for user engagement and use this questionnaire in several randomised controlled trials. From the results, we hope to get insights into how user engagement affects adherence and therapy success.

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          Most cited references 10

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          A behavior change model for internet interventions.

          The Internet has become a major component to health care and has important implications for the future of the health care system. One of the most notable aspects of the Web is its ability to provide efficient, interactive, and tailored content to the user. Given the wide reach and extensive capabilities of the Internet, researchers in behavioral medicine have been using it to develop and deliver interactive and comprehensive treatment programs with the ultimate goal of impacting patient behavior and reducing unwanted symptoms. To date, however, many of these interventions have not been grounded in theory or developed from behavior change models, and no overarching model to explain behavior change in Internet interventions has yet been published. The purpose of this article is to propose a model to help guide future Internet intervention development and predict and explain behavior changes and symptom improvement produced by Internet interventions. The model purports that effective Internet interventions produce (and maintain) behavior change and symptom improvement via nine nonlinear steps: the user, influenced by environmental factors, affects website use and adherence, which is influenced by support and website characteristics. Website use leads to behavior change and symptom improvement through various mechanisms of change. The improvements are sustained via treatment maintenance. By grounding Internet intervention research within a scientific framework, developers can plan feasible, informed, and testable Internet interventions, and this form of treatment will become more firmly established.
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            Computer-aided psychotherapy for anxiety disorders: a meta-analytic review.

            Computer-aided psychotherapy (CP) is said to (1) be as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy, while requiring less therapist time, for anxiety disorder sufferers, (2) speed access to care, and (3) save traveling time. CP may be delivered on stand-alone or Internet-linked computers, palmtop computers, phone-interactive voice response, DVDs, and cell phones. The authors performed a meta-analysis of 23 randomised controlled studies (RCTs) that compared CP with non-CP in anxiety disorders: phobias, n = 10; panic disorder/agoraphobia, n = 9; PTSD, n = 3; obsessive-compulsive disorder, n = 1. Overall mean effect size of CP compared with non-CP was 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32). CP and face-to-face psychotherapy did not differ significantly from each other (13 comparisons, d = -0.06). Much caution is needed when interpreting the findings indicating that outcome was unrelated to type of disorder, type of comparison group, mode of CP delivery (Internet, stand-alone PC, palmtop), and recency of the CP system and that effect size decreased when more therapist time was replaced by the computer. Because CP as a whole was as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy, certain forms of CP deserve to be integrated into routine practice.
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              What is user engagement? A conceptual framework for defining user engagement with technology

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2012
                September 2012
                : 1-4
                Affiliations
                Leuphana University Lueneburg

                Rotenbleicher Weg 67

                21335 Lueneburg

                Germany
                University of Marburg

                Gutenbergstrasse 18

                35032 Marburg

                Germany
                Leuphana University Lueneburg

                Scharnhorststrasse 1

                21335 Lueneburg

                Germany
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2012.83
                © Stefan Kleine Stegemann et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                26
                Birmingham, UK
                12 - 14 September 2012
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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