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      ‘Mind the Gap’: Evaluating User Physiological Response for Multi-Genre Video Summarisation

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      27th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2013) (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2013)

      9 - 13 September 2013

      video summarisation, personalisation, community, collaborative systems, physiological response, affect, emotion

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Existing video summarisation techniques are often only capable of summarising video from pre-specified content genres and are often not able to produce personalised summaries as they are not able to source relevant user specific data. Because users often experience strong emotions and associated physiological responses whilst watching video, their physiological response to video content may serve as a new and valuable data source for video summarisation. Previously, we developed the Entertainment–Led VIdeo Summarisation (ELVIS) technique that summarises video based on five physiological response measures: electro-dermal response (EDR), heart rate (HR), blood volume pulse (BVP), respiration rate (RR), and respiration amplitude (RA). Here, we report a statistical analysis on a range of data collected from ELVIS in trials with 100 users relating to five distinct video content genres (Action, Drama, Romance, Horror and Comedy). The results show that the ELVIS, EDR, HR, BVP, RR and RA video summaries all consistently match with the most entertaining video sub-segments as self-reported by the user, and that the composite ELVIS video summaries achieve significantly higher level of overlap compared with a RANDOM selection. More generally, users reported that, compared with video summaries produced by another contemporary video summarisation technique, ELVIS video summaries are comparatively ‘enjoyable’ and ‘informative’ for all five video content genres. We therefore conclude that video summarisation according to users’ physiological responses has great value for future development of video summarisation techniques that are applicable across a wide range of video content genres.

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          Most cited references 9

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          A generic framework of user attention model and its application in video summarization

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            Affective and physiological responses to environmental noises and music.

            Research suggests that respiratory patterns may reflect general dimensions of emotional response. In this study, we investigated the relationships between judgments of affective valence (pleasantness) and arousal and respiratory responses to acoustic stimuli. Sixteen environmental noises and 16 musical fragments of 30 s duration were presented to 31 participants, while respiration, skin conductance level and heart rate were recorded. Judgments of valence and arousal were registered using the 9-point Self-Assessment Manikin. For noises, breathing accelerated and minute ventilation augmented with decreases in pleasantness for low-arousal stimuli and with increases in arousal for positive stimuli. For music, breathing accelerated and minute ventilation augmented with increases both in rated valence and arousal. Skin conductance level increased with arousal ratings for music but not for noises, whereas mean heart rate increased with rated arousal for noises but not for music. Although both noises and music are sound-vibrations, differences in the relationships between affective judgments and physiological responses were found suggesting differences in the processing of the two types of acoustic stimuli.
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              Frustrating the user on purpose: a step toward building an affective computer

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2013
                September 2013
                : 1-6
                Affiliations
                Brunel University

                London, UK
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2013.46
                © Arthur G. Money et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. 27th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2013), Brunel University, London, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                27th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2013)
                HCI
                27
                Brunel University, London, UK
                9 - 13 September 2013
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2013)
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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