Blog
About

114
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A joint activity theory analysis of body interactions in multiplayer virtual basketball

      , ,

      Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014) (HCI)

      BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)

      9 - 12 September 2014

      Joint Activity Theory, Body Interaction, Virtual World, Virtual Basketball, Games, Gesture

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          To create embodied agents which exhibit realistic behaviour, we should first examine how humans behave with each other in the same context. In this paper, we define the context as navigating a virtual environment and using body movement as signals for communication. We undertake a novel experiment in which two humans play virtual basketball as a team in distributed locations, using only their bodies to navigate and execute tasks. Participants interact mainly through moving throughout the virtual world while passing a virtual ball. We propose that joint activity theory concepts are prevalent in virtual world communication, find evidence to support this hypothesis, and generate insights which can be used to create effective agents in the same type of environment. Even with a limited communication channel, it was found that the intention of players was able to be understood, which shows the existence of various joint activity theory concepts.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 9

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Why bodies? Twelve reasons for including bodily expressions in affective neuroscience.

          Why bodies? It is rather puzzling that given the massive interest in affective neuroscience in the last decade, it still seems to make sense to raise the question 'Why bodies' and to try to provide an answer to it, as is the goal of this article. There are now hundreds of articles on human emotion perception ranging from behavioural studies to brain imaging experiments. These experimental studies complement decades of reports on affective disorders in neurological patients and clinical studies of psychiatric populations. The most cursory glance at the literature on emotion in humans, now referred to by the umbrella term of social and affective neuroscience, shows that over 95 per cent of them have used faces as stimuli. Of the remaining 5 per cent, a few have used scenes or auditory information including human voices, music or environmental sounds. But by far the smallest number has looked into whole-body expressions. As a rough estimate, a search on PubMed today, 1 May 2009, yields 3521 hits for emotion x faces, 1003 hits for emotion x music and 339 hits for emotion x bodies. When looking in more detail, the body x emotion category in fact yields a majority of papers on well-being, nursing, sexual violence or organ donation. But the number of cognitive and affective neuroscience studies of emotional body perception as of today is lower than 20. Why then have whole bodies and bodily expressions not attracted the attention of researchers so far? The goal of this article is to contribute some elements for an answer to this question. I believe that there is something to learn from the historical neglect of bodies and bodily expressions. I will next address some historical misconceptions about whole-body perception, and in the process I intend not only to provide an impetus for this kind of work but also to contribute to a better understanding of the significance of the affective dimension of behaviour, mind and brain as seen from the vantage point of bodily communication. Subsequent sections discuss available evidence for the neurofunctional basis of facial and bodily expressions as well as neuropsychological and clinical studies of bodily expressions.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Affective Body Expression Perception and Recognition: A Survey

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Bridging the Gap between Social Animal and Unsocial Machine: A Survey of Social Signal Processing

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University

                Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 Japan
                Faculty of Engineering, Assiut University

                71515 Assiut, Egypt
                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2014
                September 2014
                : 62-71
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2014.10
                © Divesh Lala et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014), Southport, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)
                HCI
                28
                Southport, UK
                9 - 12 September 2014
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

                Comments

                Comment on this article