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      On the Integration of Self-tracking Data amongst Quantified Self Members

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      Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014) (HCI)

      BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)

      9 - 12 September 2014

      Quantified Self, self-tracking, self-monitoring, personal informatics, data integration

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          Abstract

          Self-tracking, the process of recording one’s own behaviours, thoughts and feelings, is a popular approach to enhance one’s self-knowledge. While dedicated self-tracking apps and devices support data collection, previous research highlights that the integration of data constitutes a barrier for users. In this study we investigated how members of the Quantified Self movement—early adopters of self-tracking tools—overcome these barriers. We conducted a qualitative analysis of 51 videos of Quantified Self presentations to explore intentions for collecting data, methods for integrating and representing data, and how intentions and methods shaped reflection. The findings highlight two different intentions—striving for self-improvement and curiosity in personal data—which shaped how these users integrated data, i.e. the effort required. Furthermore, we identified three methods for representing data—binary, structured and abstract—which influenced reflection. Binary representations supported reflection-in-action, whereas structured and abstract representations supported iterative processes of data collection, integration and reflection. For people tracking out of curiosity, this iterative engagement with personal data often became an end in itself, rather than a means to achieve a goal. We discuss how these findings contribute to our current understanding of self-tracking amongst Quantified Self members and beyond, and we conclude with directions for future work to support self-trackers with their aspirations.

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          Memoing in qualitative research: Probing data and processes

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            Design requirements for technologies that encourage physical activity

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              Understanding quantified-selfers' practices in collecting and exploring personal data

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2014
                September 2014
                : 151-160
                Affiliations
                The University of Melbourne

                Parkville Victoria 3010, Australia
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2014.19
                © Mark Whooley et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014), Southport, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)
                HCI
                28
                Southport, UK
                9 - 12 September 2014
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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