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      Fusing system design and social science to reduce susceptibility to online influence

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      Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Fusion

      11 - 15 July 2016

      Social influence, individual differences, online scams, phishing, human-computer interaction

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Spear phishing and other forms of online scams are having an increasing impact on society. This paper overviews our current work exploring individual differences in susceptibility to malicious influence online from a social science perspective and asks how fusion with adaptive and collaborative system approaches could be harnessed to reduce differential susceptibility across individuals via system design processes.

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          Most cited references 21

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          The effect of positive feelings on risk taking: When the chips are down

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            Perils of Internet fraud: an empirical investigation of deception and trust with experienced Internet consumers

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              Decision-Making Under Risk: Integrating Perspectives From Biology, Economics, and Psychology.

              Decision-making under risk has been variably characterized and examined in many different disciplines. However, interdisciplinary integration has not been forthcoming. Classic theories of decision-making have not been amply revised in light of greater empirical data on actual patterns of decision-making behavior. Furthermore, the meta-theoretical framework of evolution by natural selection has been largely ignored in theories of decision-making under risk in the human behavioral sciences. In this review, I critically examine four of the most influential theories of decision-making from economics, psychology, and biology: expected utility theory, prospect theory, risk-sensitivity theory, and heuristic approaches. I focus especially on risk-sensitivity theory, which offers a framework for understanding decision-making under risk that explicitly involves evolutionary considerations. I also review robust empirical evidence for individual differences and environmental/situational factors that predict actual risky decision-making that any general theory must account for. Finally, I offer steps toward integrating various theoretical perspectives and empirical findings on risky decision-making.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2016
                July 2016
                : 1-3
                Affiliations
                School of Management University of Bath, BA2 7AY
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2016.58
                © Williams et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2016 Conference Fusion, Bournemouth, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                30
                Bournemouth University, Poole, UK
                11 - 15 July 2016
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Fusion
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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