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      Time critical? Does exposure time and brand information change users’ evaluations of website appeal?

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      Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Fusion

      11 - 15 July 2016

      Website appeal, Visual aesthetics, Decision-making, Information framing, Eye movements

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          Abstract

          First impressions have been deemed important when making evaluations of website appeal. However, little is known about the long term nature of decision-making with respect to judgements of website appeal and how these may be shaped by other information available to us. This research aims to examine (a) how users’ evaluations of website may change over time, (b) how brand information may change appeal evaluations (as opposed to judgements of products shown on a website) and (c) whether combining eye tracking with traditional subjective measures of appeal can inform us about the information used in making decisions about website appeal. Research outcomes will help to shape the formation of guidelines for future website development.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Social influence bias: a randomized experiment.

          Our society is increasingly relying on the digitized, aggregated opinions of others to make decisions. We therefore designed and analyzed a large-scale randomized experiment on a social news aggregation Web site to investigate whether knowledge of such aggregates distorts decision-making. Prior ratings created significant bias in individual rating behavior, and positive and negative social influences created asymmetric herding effects. Whereas negative social influence inspired users to correct manipulated ratings, positive social influence increased the likelihood of positive ratings by 32% and created accumulating positive herding that increased final ratings by 25% on average. This positive herding was topic-dependent and affected by whether individuals were viewing the opinions of friends or enemies. A mixture of changing opinion and greater turnout under both manipulations together with a natural tendency to up-vote on the site combined to create the herding effects. Such findings will help interpret collective judgment accurately and avoid social influence bias in collective intelligence in the future.
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            The briefest of glances: the time course of natural scene understanding.

            What information is available from a brief glance at a novel scene? Although previous efforts to answer this question have focused on scene categorization or object detection, real-world scenes contain a wealth of information whose perceptual availability has yet to be explored. We compared image exposure thresholds in several tasks involving basic-level categorization or global- property classification. All thresholds were remarkably short: Observers achieved 75%-correct performance with presentations ranging from 19 to 67 ms, reaching maximum performance at about 100 ms. Global-property categorization was performed with significantly less presentation time than basic-level categorization, which suggests that there exists a time during early visual processing when a scene may be classified as, for example, a large space or navigable, but not yet as a mountain or lake. Comparing the relative availability of visual information reveals bottlenecks in the accumulation of meaning. Understanding these bottlenecks provides critical insight into the computations underlying rapid visual understanding.
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              Facets of visual aesthetics

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2016
                July 2016
                : 1-3
                Affiliations
                Bournemouth University

                Fern Barrow, Poole, BH12 5BB UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2016.90
                © Bradley et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2016 Conference Fusion, Bournemouth, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                30
                Bournemouth University, Poole, UK
                11 - 15 July 2016
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Fusion
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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