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Evaluation of an App to Support Healthy Living by Older Adults

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Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017) (EVA)

Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

11 – 13 July 2017

healthy eating, healthy liquid intake, older adults, tablet computers, mobile apps

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      Abstract

      Smartphone and tablet computers apps are a promising tool to promote healthy attitudes and behaviours among older adults. A tablet computer app to support older adults in maintaining good nutrition and hydration was developed to allow them to track their intake of fruit and vegetables and appropriate liquids. A highly user-centred design lifecycle was used which culminated in a field study with fifteen older adults who used the app for two weeks. Two main themes emerged from the results of their experiences with the app: ease of use and usefulness of the app. Although there were some usability issues, overall participants found the app easy to use, straightforward and designed to do what it was supposed to do. For most of the participants, the app acted as a motivational tool helping them to change their daily diet to eat more fruit and vegetables, and to drink more liquid.

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      Using thematic analysis in psychology

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        Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables is related to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of cohort studies.

        Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables has been shown to be associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in many epidemiological studies, however, the extent of the association is uncertain. We quantitatively assessed the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and incidence of CHD by carrying out a meta-analysis of cohort studies. Studies were included if they reported relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) of CHD with respect to frequency of fruit and vegetable intake. Twelve studies, consisting of 13 independent cohorts, met the inclusion criteria. There were 278,459 individuals (9143 CHD events) with a median follow-up of 11 years. Compared with individuals who had less than 3 servings/day of fruit and vegetables, the pooled RR of CHD was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.86-1.00, P=0.06) for those with 3-5 servings/day and 0.83 (0.77-0.89, P<0.0001) for those with more than 5 servings/day. Subgroup analyses showed that both fruits and vegetables had a significant protective effect on CHD. Our meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies demonstrates that increased consumption of fruit and vegetables from less than 3 to more than 5 servings/day is related to a 17% reduction in CHD risk, whereas increased intake to 3-5 servings/day is associated with a smaller and borderline significant reduction in CHD risk. These results provide strong support for the recommendations to consume more than 5 servings/day of fruit and vegetables.
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          Rank Transformations as a Bridge between Parametric and Nonparametric Statistics

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Department of Computer Science, University of York, United Kingdom
            Contributors
            Conference
            July 2017
            July 2017
            : 1-14
            10.14236/ewic/HCI2017.42
            © Sani et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development. Proceedings of British HCI 2017 – Digital Make-Believe, Sunderland, UK.

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017)
            EVA
            London, UK
            11 – 13 July 2017
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

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