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      Finding common ground: comparing children’s and parents’ views on children’s online safety

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      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017) (EVA)

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

      11 – 13 July 2017

      Online safety, Safety mediation, Internet, Web 2.0. Social media, Children, Parents, Family

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          Abstract

          This study examines children’s online safety with a particular interest in children’s online safety skills and conduct as well as parents’ mediation strategies. A survey of 141 children and 163 par-ents was conducted. Children have encountered a variety of different online threats, but not many children have been scared or disturbed by what they have seen or experienced. Our study revealed that children have a significantly more positive opinion about their own safety skills than their par-ents have, and that parents have a significantly more positive view on the amount of online safety mediation they engage in compared to children’s view. Implications of these results for research and for designing tools for children’s online safety mediation are discussed, suggesting the ap-proach of ‘family-negotiated online safety of children’.

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          Digital natives: where is the evidence?

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            Portfolios of Control Modes and IS Project Management

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              To know you is to trust you: parents' trust is rooted in child disclosure of information.

              As adolescents spend increasing amounts of time away from home, parental trust should become important. Little is known about how trust develops, however. We propose that parental trust is primarily based on knowledge. In this study, we pitted three types of knowledge of the child against each other in the prediction of parental trust: knowledge of feelings and concerns; of past delinquency; and of daily activities. Results showed that knowledge of daily activities was more important than knowledge of past delinquency. In further analyses, knowledge of daily activities that came from the child's spontaneous disclosure was most closely linked to parental trust. These findings add support to a recent re-interpretation of parental "monitoring" as parental knowledge that mainly comes from spontaneous child disclosure. Additionally, the role of parental trust for dysfunctional family relations was examined and it was found that the relations between the child's delinquency and family dysfunction were mediated by parental trust. Finally, even though there was substantial agreement between parents and children about parental trust in the child, the individual's unique perspectives were important. Family dysfunction from the child's perspective was based on whether they believed that their parents trusted them, and parental perceptions of family dysfunction were based on their own trust in the child. Copyright 1999 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2017
                July 2017
                : 1-12
                Affiliations
                INTERACT Research Unit, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Oulu

                P.O Box 3000, 90014 Oulu, Finland
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2017.43
                © Hartikainen et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development. Proceedings of British HCI 2017 – Digital Make-Believe, Sunderland, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017)
                EVA
                London, UK
                11 – 13 July 2017
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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