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      Clinicians’ Attitudes and Practices on Technology-Supported Notetaking: A Survey

      ,

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017) (EVA)

      Electronic Visualisation and the Arts

      11 – 13 July 2017

      Notetaking, Paper, Affordances, Clinician, Mirror therapy, P.A.T.C.H.

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          Abstract

          In this paper we report the results of a web-based survey that was aimed at improving our understanding of therapists’ attitudes towards - and adoption of - technologies designed to support medical documentation. 310 valid responses from 28 countries were analysed. The PATCH scale was used to measure attitudes towards computers in healthcare. Significant differences in PATCH scores across the included countries were identified. 36% of the respondents used only paper for notetaking whereas 52% used both paper- and software-based approaches. Negative and positive experiences of employing the software tools were analysed together with the respondents’ suggestions for enhancing those tools. Overall, clinicians’ attitudes towards technology-supported notetaking were encouraging, although a number of technical issues remain to be solved.

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          Most cited references 32

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          Systematic review: impact of health information technology on quality, efficiency, and costs of medical care.

          Experts consider health information technology key to improving efficiency and quality of health care. To systematically review evidence on the effect of health information technology on quality, efficiency, and costs of health care. The authors systematically searched the English-language literature indexed in MEDLINE (1995 to January 2004), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and the Periodical Abstracts Database. We also added studies identified by experts up to April 2005. Descriptive and comparative studies and systematic reviews of health information technology. Two reviewers independently extracted information on system capabilities, design, effects on quality, system acquisition, implementation context, and costs. 257 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies addressed decision support systems or electronic health records. Approximately 25% of the studies were from 4 academic institutions that implemented internally developed systems; only 9 studies evaluated multifunctional, commercially developed systems. Three major benefits on quality were demonstrated: increased adherence to guideline-based care, enhanced surveillance and monitoring, and decreased medication errors. The primary domain of improvement was preventive health. The major efficiency benefit shown was decreased utilization of care. Data on another efficiency measure, time utilization, were mixed. Empirical cost data were limited. Available quantitative research was limited and was done by a small number of institutions. Systems were heterogeneous and sometimes incompletely described. Available financial and contextual data were limited. Four benchmark institutions have demonstrated the efficacy of health information technologies in improving quality and efficiency. Whether and how other institutions can achieve similar benefits, and at what costs, are unclear.
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            The use of visual feedback, in particular mirror visual feedback, in restoring brain function.

            This article reviews the potential use of visual feedback, focusing on mirror visual feedback, introduced over 15 years ago, for the treatment of many chronic neurological disorders that have long been regarded as intractable such as phantom pain, hemiparesis from stroke and complex regional pain syndrome. Apart from its clinical importance, mirror visual feedback paves the way for a paradigm shift in the way we approach neurological disorders. Instead of resulting entirely from irreversible damage to specialized brain modules, some of them may arise from short-term functional shifts that are potentially reversible. If so, relatively simple therapies can be devised--of which mirror visual feedback is an example--to restore function.
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              Heuristic evaluation of user interfaces

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2017
                July 2017
                : 1-12
                Affiliations
                University of Leicester

                LE1 7RH Leicester

                United Kingdom
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2017.56
                © Law et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development. Proceedings of British HCI 2017 – Digital Make-Believe, Sunderland, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2017)
                EVA
                London, UK
                11 – 13 July 2017
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Electronic Visualisation and the Arts
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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