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      Towards Fostering Play Between Separate Spaces in a Public Venue

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Social play, Remote play, Collocated play, Social icebreaking, Provotypes, Children

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            Abstract

            HCI has a longstanding interest in facilitating impromptu play between both collocated or remotely located unacquainted people. Less explored is fostering play between people in close, but separate locations. We present early results from a project investigating if ICT can facilitate new social play encounters through connecting different levels of a children’s play centre. We designed and deployed two large-scale interactive mockups of robots: a creature with an enormous tongue; and a device that physically raised children’s artworks to offer them as drawing stencils to users one storey above. Although our operation of these mockups was very ad hoc, our field-testing identified several promising insights. We suggest opportunities for further exploration in designing to connect separate places and advice for design researchers conducting similar tests.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Contributors
            Conference
            July 2018
            July 2018
            : 1-5
            Affiliations
            [0001]University of Southern Denmark, Kolding DK 6000
            [0002]BNUX, Beijing Normal University

            19 Xinjiekou Outer St, Beijing
            Article
            10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.120
            18af5171-546c-43f4-8b36-8d2dacdbde6a
            © Mitchell et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
            HCI
            32
            Belfast, UK
            4 - 6 July 2018
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            Human Computer Interaction Conference
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

            References

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            2. 2013 Breaching Barriers to Collaboration in Public Spaces, in: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction TEI ’14 ACM, New York, NY, USA, pp. 213–220.

            3. 2004 Social Catalysts: enhancing communication in mediated spaces.

            4. 2017 Understanding collocated social interaction between Pokémon GO players, in: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia ACM, pp. 151–163.

            5. 2012 Wizard of oz studies in HRI: a systematic review and new reporting guidelines Journal of Human-Robot Interaction 1.

            6. 2007 Encouraging witting participation and performance in digital live art, in: Proceedings of the 21st British HCI Group Annual Conference on People and Computers: HCI... but Not as We Know It-Volume 1 British Computer Society, pp. 13–23.

            7. 2008 Here comes everybody: The power of organizing without organizations Penguin.

            8. 2009 Social immersive media: pursuing best practices for multi-user interactive camera/projector exhibits, in: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems ACM, pp. 1447–1456.

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