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      Exploring Memory Interventions in Depression through Lifelogging Lens

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Memory impairments, depression, overgeneralization, negative bias, rumination, lifelogging technologies

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          Abstract

          Depression is a major affective disorder with significant socio-economic cost. Distinctive autobiographical memory impairments in depression include overgeneralization, negative-bias, and repetitive negative thinking. A few psychotherapeutic interventions have been purposefully designed to address these impairments, albeit they benefit from limited technological support. This paper reports an analysis of four memory-based interventions proven effective in the therapeutic practice targeting depression. We also explored the memory impairments addressed by these interventions. Our findings led to three design implications for digital tools in this space. We suggest the value of supporting enriched positive memory recall, negative memory reappraisal, and future episodic imagination.

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          Most cited references 23

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          Encoding specificity and retrieval processes in episodic memory.

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            Autobiographical episodic memory-based training for the treatment of mood, anxiety and stress-related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

            We review evidence for training programmes that manipulate autobiographical processing in order to treat mood, anxiety, and stress-related disorders, using the GRADE criteria to judge evidence quality. We also position the current status of this research within the UK Medical Research Council's (2000, 2008) framework for the development of novel interventions. A literature search according to PRISMA guidelines identified 15 studies that compared an autobiographical episodic memory-based training (AET) programme to a control condition, in samples with a clinician-derived diagnosis. Identified AET programmes included Memory Specificity Training (Raes, Williams, & Hermans, 2009), concreteness training (Watkins, Baeyens, & Read, 2009), Competitive Memory Training (Korrelboom, van der Weele, Gjaltema, & Hoogstraten, 2009), imagery-based training of future autobiographical episodes (Blackwell & Holmes, 2010), and life review/reminiscence therapy (Arean et al., 1993). Cohen's d was calculated for between-group differences in symptom change from pre- to post-intervention and to follow-up. We also completed meta-analyses for programmes evaluated across multiple studies, and for the overall effect of AET as a treatment approach. Results demonstrated promising evidence for AET in the treatment of depression (d=0.32), however effect sizes varied substantially (from -0.18 to 1.91) across the different training protocols. Currently, research on AET for the treatment of anxiety and stress-related disorders is not yet at a stage to draw firm conclusions regarding efficacy as there were only a very small number of studies which met inclusion criteria. AET offers a potential avenue through which low-intensity treatment for affective disturbance might be offered.
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              Computers in talk-based mental health interventions

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-6
                Affiliations
                Lancaster University

                Lancaster, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.161
                © Qu et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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