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      Playful Interactive Systems to Support Physical Activity Among Wheelchair Users

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Wheelchair, Physical activity, Thematic analysis, Integrated Behavioural Model, Playful technology

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          Abstract

          Health benefits associated with physical activity (PA) are widely accepted; however, nearly two-thirds of people with disabilities are not active enough to achieve health benefits. This is due to several unique environmental, programmatic and attitudinal barriers. Technology can be leveraged to reduce these barriers, e.g., Kinect being used to create movement-based games for children with mobility impairment. However, wheelchair-accessible games have not previously been built to address moderate-to-vigorous level exercise provision for wheelchair users. This PhD project will explore how to create game-based solutions to facilitate exercise and PA among wheelchair users, seeking to answer the following research questions: How do wheelchair users engage with PA and technology, how can we build playful systems to support wheelchair user's efforts to stay or become active, and can playful interactive systems facilitate positive exercise and PA experiences among wheelchair users? It is hoped that this work will actionable insights into the creation of game-based solutions to facilitate exercise and PA among wheelchair users.

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          Most cited references 15

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          The Motivational Pull of Video Games: A Self-Determination Theory Approach

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            Perceived barriers to and facilitators of physical activity in young adults with childhood-onset physical disabilities.

            To explore the main barriers to and facilitators of physical activity in young adults with childhood-onset physical disabilities. Qualitative study using focus groups. Sixteen persons (12 men and 4 women) aged 22.4 (standard deviation 3.4) years, of whom 50% were wheelchair-dependent, participated in the study. Eight were diagnosed with myelomeningocele, 4 with cerebral palsy, 2 with acquired brain injury and 2 with rheumatoid arthritis. Three focus group sessions of 1.5 h were conducted using a semi-structured question route to assess perceived barriers to and facilitators of physical activity. Tape recordings were transcribed verbatim and content analysed. According to the Physical Activity for People with a Physical Disability model, barriers and facilitators were subdivided into personal factors and environmental factors. Participants reported several barriers related to attitude and motivation. In addition, lack of energy, existing injury or fear of developing injuries or complications, limited physical activity facilities, and lack of information and knowledge, appeared to be barriers to physical activity. Fun and social contacts were mentioned as facilitators of engaging in physical activity, as well as improved health and fitness. Young adults with childhood-onset physical disabilities perceived various personal and environmental factors as barriers to or facilitators of physical activity. These should be taken into account when developing interventions to promote physical activity in this population.
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              Reducing cardiometabolic disease in spinal cord injury.

              Accelerated cardiometabolic disease is a serious health hazard after spinal cord injuries (SCI). Lifestyle intervention with diet and exercise remains the cornerstone of effective cardiometabolic syndrome treatment. Behavioral approaches enhance compliance and benefits derived from both diet and exercise interventions and are necessary to assure that persons with SCI profit from intervention. Multitherapy strategies will likely be needed to control challenging component risks, such as gain in body mass, which has far reaching implications for maintenance of daily function as well as health.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-8
                Affiliations
                University of Lincoln Brayford pool Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.196
                © Mason. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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